• Should I Attend a Homosexual Wedding? Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2015

    Why might a Christian refuse to attend, cater, or participate in a same-sex marriage ceremony? For simplicity’s sake, let’s assume this is a discussion among traditional Christians who believe—as the church has always believed and as most of the global church still believes—that same-sex behavior is sinful and that marriage is a covenantal, conjugal union of a man and a woman. With that clarifying comment, we can address the question head-on: Why would a Christian feel conscience bound not to attend or participate in a gay wedding? It’s not because of bigotry or fear or because we … View Resource

  • Where and How Do We Draw the Line? Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, charity.” Sounds nice, but which are which? Everyone wants to be unified in what really matters, to agree to disagree on what isn’t as important, and to exercise love in all things. But no one seems to agree on what really matters a lot, a little, or not at all. As hard as it can be determining the content of our faith, it can be even harder figuring out where to put up our fences. This business of deciding where and how to draw doctrinal lines is incredibly complex. I … View Resource

  • The Name of Jesus Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Over the past two thousand years, more people on planet earth have known the name of Jesus than any other name. Since AD 33, over eight billion people, by one estimate, have claimed to be followers of this Jesus — or Jésus or Isus or whatever the Christ is called in your language. Billions more have heard of His name. Today, the name of Jesus can be found in more than six thousand languages, and more are being added every year. On the one hand, it’s strange that this single name has dominated the past two thousand years of world … View Resource

  • The Gates of Hell Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    I hope I don’t ruin one of your favorite verses. Ok, I kind of hope I do, but only so it can be one of your favorite verses in a better way. In Matthew 16, Jesus takes his disciples to the district of Caesarea Philippi and asks them the question: “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They stumble around a bit , giving the latest updates from the crowd. Then Cephas pipes up: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus commends His outspoken disciple: “You are Peter, and on this rock … View Resource

  • Blame It on Babylon Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    In the book of Revelation, Babylon is a symbol of all that’s wrong in the world. It’s the system, the way things are in a sinful creation. Babylon is worldliness. If you study Revelation 17, you’ll notice three things about the prostitute Babylon. First, she is attractive. She has royal clothes, purple and scarlet. She glitters with gold and is decked out in pearls and precious stones. She’s got her best threads on, alluring and seductive. Second, the influence of Babylon is pervasive. She sits on many waters, which are peoples, multitudes, nations, and languages (Rev. 17:15). Babylon the … View Resource

  • Encourage One Another Article by Kevin DeYoung

    There are a lot of interesting conclusions to be gleaned from the laundry list of names in Romans 16. But the one I appreciate the most is Paul’s example of offering divinely inspired encouragement . According to my biblically informed definition, encouragement means highlighting the evidences of God’s grace in the gospel or in a gospel-centered person to the glory of God. Each part of that definition is important. Encouragement is not spotlighting a person but underlining God’s grace. It is not about commending nice people to make them feel good but about commending the work of the gospel in others … View Resource

  • Apostolic Anxiety Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2011

    Second Corinthians 11:28 always seemed like a strange verse to me — until I became a pastor. Here’s Paul, rattling off all the ways he’s been beat up for Jesus — imprisonments, lashes, rods, stonings, shipwrecks, drifting at sea, sleepless nights, hunger and thirst, cold and expos ure, danger from everyone everywhere (vv. 23–27). And then, as the cherry on top, Paul mentions one more trial: “apart from other things, there is the daily pressure on me of my anxiety for all the churches” (v. 28). This is the mighty apostle, the one who counted it a joy to … View Resource

  • Love for the Big and the Small Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    Scripture says the human race should be fruitful and multiply (Gen. 1:28; Mal. 2:15). Children are always seen as a blessing from the Lord (PsS. 127:3–5; 128:3–4). Church growth happens evangelistically and covenantally. So I like big families. My wife and I are on our way to a big family with four little ones already. In counseling, I challenge newlyweds to think through the reasons for birth control (which I am not against) instead of just assuming it. I warn against the abortifacient possibilities of taking the pill. I try to dissuade most young couples from … View Resource

  • All Out of Whack Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that the average reader of this fine periodical is a fan of theology. I’m thinking most Tabletalk subscribers are thoughtful, doctrinally attuned Christians. I also imagine a few of these Christians might be a wee bit opinionated. It takes one to know one. I don’t use opinionated as a bad word. We should be immovable on some matters, convinced of others, and it’s not bad to have strong opinions on all the rest. But let’s be honest; sometimes in conservative evangelical circles, the intensity with … View Resource

  • The Devil Is Not in the Details Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    It may have sounded prophetic at one point, but now it’s rather prosaic. Everyone knows (or is supposed to know) that individualism is bad. An emphasis on the individual — such a common theme in the West — has been blamed for myriad problems, including everything from friendlessness to consumerism, from contemporary praise music to gated communities. And no doubt, individualism has its downside. For the church, it’s meant an aversion to authority, a reluctance to accept certain elements of covenant theology, and a community life that isn’t everything it could be. Problem duly noted. But let us not forget … View Resource

  • Not One Of, but the One Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    There is one foundational question each of us must face. By “foundational,” I don’t mean it is the only question we must answer. What I mean is that this question is so important that if you get this one wrong, you are going to get most everything else that really matters wrong. The foundational question is the famous query Jesus posed to the disciples at Caesarea Philippi: “Who do you say that I am?” (Mark 8:29). It may be surprising to some that Jesus even asked this question. The foundational question for Jesus is not “Who are … View Resource

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary Christians, was influential and controversial in her day. She was burned at the stake in Paris in 1310, and her views were later condemned at the Council of Vienne in 1312. What got her in trouble was The Mirror of Simple Souls, Marguerite’s exploration on what she calls the seven states of grace. In the fifth and sixth states … View Resource

  • Knowledge and Maturity Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    All else being equal, I’d rather have a mature Christian with simple theological knowledge than an extremely knowledgeable, well-read Christian without a lot of maturity. But, of course, neither situation is desirable. Let me explain. A Tale of Two Corners In this corner, we see Mr. Bookworm. He’s not quite thirty years old. He’s very intelligent. He’s read Calvin, Edwards, Luther, and Bavinck. He knows Warfield and Hodge, Piper and Carson, too. Since coming to the Lord in college, Mr. Bookworm has been on fire for learning. He listens to a dozen sermons each week on … View Resource

  • What Made David Great? Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Everyone who knows the Bible knows that King David was a great man. And yet everyone familiar with the Bible also recognizes that David did a lot of not-so-great things. Of course, there was the sin with Bathsheba, the murder of her husband Uriah, and the subsequent cover-up. That was not exactly delighting in the law of the Lord (Ps. 1:2). But there was also the ill-advised census motivated by David’s pride, not to mention a series of lessons in how not to manage your household well. For being a man after God’s own heart (Acts 13:22), David … View Resource

  • The Glory of Plodding Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2010

    It’s sexy among young people—my generation—to talk about ditching institutional religion and starting a revolution of real Christ-followers living in real community without the confines of church. Besides being unbiblical, such notions of churchless Christianity are unrealistic. It’s immaturity actually, like the newly engaged couple who think romance preserves the marriage, when the couple celebrating their golden anniversary know it’s the institution of marriage that preserves the romance. Without the God-given habit of corporate worship and the God-given mandate of corporate accountability, we will not prove faithful over the long haul. View Resource