• Superficial Joy vs. True Joy Article by Joe Holland

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2017

    Banking is boring. Or, at least, that is what most people think—that is, unless you’re the son of a banker, which I am. You see, every once in a while, my dad would bring me to work with him and occupy me with whatever he thought a ten-year-old boy would find interesting in a bank. I always ended up staring at the counterfeit money display—a medium-sized case that showed, side by side, real and counterfeit money along with how you could tell the difference. Being able to tell the difference between real and fake money isn’t just interesting … View Resource

  • Coaching and the Suffering Christian Article by Joe Holland

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014 | Hebrews 12

    I have spent my life being coached or coaching. I’ve played most of the major sports and some of the more unusual ones as well. I’ve learned that coaches face one major perennial challenge. It is the difficulty of motivating your athletes when pain and fatigue are urging them to quit. I’ve found that there are three basic coaching styles that seek to answer this challenge. The first coaching style asserts that true athletes don’t feel pain. It simply doesn’t exist; it is a figment of the imagination. This is the mind-over-matter rationale. Pain isn … View Resource

  • The Church: Your Story Article by Joe Holland

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Matthew 16

    Why is this happening to me? What is my purpose in this life? If God is so powerful, then why does He allow me to be treated this way by people who are opposed to Him? Will God ever give me victory over this particular sin? These are the types of questions that pepper the ordinary Christian life. Christians want an explanation from God for their current suffering and a steadfast promise that their own life will turn out well. Christians know that “for those who love God all things work together for good” (Rom. 8:28), but it is … View Resource

  • Soft Hearts, Solid Spines Article by Joe Holland

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2012

    The Internet allows unprecedented opportunity for communication between Christians from different theological traditions. The results have not been pretty. Comment threads are the Devil’s playground and blogs his amusement park. And even if we exclude online media, theological bickering between Christians is and has been pervasive. Regrettably, Christians who hold to the Reformed confessions are often viewed by other Christians outside our tradition as some of the least winsome members of what we call the communion of the saints. The command to love has been lost by us, if not lost on us. But how can the theologically astute love … View Resource