• Pursuing Holiness: An Interview with Jerry Bridges Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | Galatians 5

    Tabletalk: How did you become a Christian, and how did the Lord call you to ministry with The Navigators? Jerry Bridges: I grew up in a church that had an altar call at every Sunday service. I went forward at ages 9, 11, and 13, but was never born again. Finally, at age 18, alone in my bed one night, I prayed, “God whatever it takes, I want Christ to be my Savior.” Instantly I had assurance of my salvation. While serving in the Navy during the Korean War, I met The Navigators through another Navy officer and began to … View Resource

  • The Pursuit of Holiness: An Interview with Jerry Bridges Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    Tabletalk: What do you see as the greatest need in the church today? Jerry Bridges: There are so many needs in the church today that it is difficult to single out one as the greatest. However, if I had to pick one, I would say the most fundamental need is an ever-growing awareness of the holiness of God. I don’t say this because that is the main emphasis of Ligonier Ministries but because I believe it is true. The emphasis of my own ministry has been the believer’s personal pursuit of holiness. But years ago I came to realize the … View Resource

  • The Resurrection of Jesus Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008

    This article on the resurrection of Jesus appears at the time of year when we are focusing on His birth, not His death and resurrection. To stop and think about the resurrection may seem like an unnecessary aside to the beautiful story of our Savior’s birth.  To think only about the birth of Jesus, however, fails to do justice to the incarnation. It fails to consider the purpose of Jesus’ coming to earth. At the occasion of His birth, the angel said to the shepherds, “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior … View Resource

  • The Agonizing Prayer Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008 | Matthew 26

    Isaiah wrote prophetically of Jesus that He was “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief” (Isa. 53:3). Though those words were descriptive of His entire life, we see them coming to a climax in the garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). Luke tells us that Jesus was in such agony as He prayed that “His sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground” (Luke 22:44). What was it that caused … View Resource

  • The Worldwide Gospel Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008 | Matthew 24

    In His monumental discourse on the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, and His second coming at the end of the age (Matt. 24–25), Jesus covers a vast amount of territory. While all of the discourse is important, there are certain statements that stand out in the same way that higher peaks rise above an entire mountain range. One such peak is Matthew 24:14: “And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come.” These words from Jesus stand in a long line … View Resource

  • It’s Me, O Lord Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008 | Matthew 22

    The day after Jesus cleansed the temple, He was confronted by the leaders who questioned His authority to drive out the money changers and merchants. In response to their questioning His authority, Jesus asked them about the baptism of John, whether it was from heaven or from men. In asking this counter-question, Jesus was not evading their question. Rather, He was driving them into a theological corner. If they answered from heaven, He would say, “Why then did you not believe him?” But if they answered, “from men,” they would face the hostility of the crowd who believed John … View Resource

  • The Generous Landowner Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2008

    Chapter divisions in the Bible are usually helpful as they allow us to find our way around the Scriptures. Occasionally, however, they can hinder our understanding of a passage if they cause us to look at it apart from its context. This often is the case with the parable of the laborers in the vineyard (Matt. 20:1–16). Because of the chapter division at the end of Matthew 19, we fail to understand the parable in its context of Jesus’ teaching in 19:16–30. Because that section of Matthew has already been treated in another article, we will not look at … View Resource

  • Faith and the Power of God Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    The healing of the demon possessed boy (Matt. 17:14–20) at first glance seems to be only one more in a series of miraculous healings recorded by Matthew. What makes this one unique is Jesus’ emphasis on the role of faith. It is true that faith is prominent in the miracles recorded in chapter 9, but in chapter 17 it is the lack of faith that is emphasized by Jesus. That God is not dependent on human faith for accomplishing His work is clear from the accounts of other miracles recorded by Matthew. The transfiguration of Jesus immediately prior to the … View Resource

  • The Providence of Jesus Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008 | Matthew 14

    The feeding of the five thousand, recorded in Matthew 14:13–21, is probably the most well known of all of Jesus’ miracles. It is the only one recorded by all four of the gospel writers (see Mark 6:30–44; Luke 9:10–19; John 6:1–14). It is also one that skeptics have most often tried to explain away. A common explanation is that the little boy’s example of generosity in giving his bread and fish to Jesus prompted others to share the food they had brought along, so that there was enough for all. That this was an amazing miracle is … View Resource

  • Jesus Challenges the Pharisees Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008 | Matthew 12

    The Pharisees were the ultimate religious people among the Jews during Christ’s life on earth. Determined not to break any of God’s laws, they had, over time, devised an intricate system of oral tradition to keep them from breaking the Mosaic law. One would think with such a desire to obey God that they would have recognized the perfect obedience of Jesus and affirmed and followed Him. And yet, as demonstrated by the events recorded in Matthew 12:1–37, they were His most bitter and implacable opponents. Why was this so? The essential problem lay in their different understanding of the … View Resource

  • Jesus’ Healing Ministry Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    The ninth chapter of Matthew is largely an account of the miracle-working ministry of Jesus. Five miracles are recorded, four of them physical healings, and the fifth, a restoring to life of a dead girl. But these are only representative of the many miracles Jesus performed. In fact, toward the end of the chapter Matthew seems to sum it all up by writing: “And Jesus went throughout all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom and healing every disease and affliction” (v. 35).  Several years later when Peter was preaching to … View Resource

  • Put Off and Put On Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    One of the principles of Christian growth is called the “put off and put on” principle (see Eph. 4:22–24). Behind the principle lies the fact that there are always sinful attitudes and actions we need to put off, and there are always positive traits of righteousness we need to put on more firmly.  Jesus uses this principle in Matthew 6, where the words “do not” or equivalent expressions occur ten times. With this expression, He is, of course, emphasizing the “put off.” But He doesn’t just leave us with the “do nots.” He also addresses the proper … View Resource

  • The Blessings of Humility Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    The two Christian character traits taught most frequently in the New Testament are love and humility. The classic passage on love is, of course, 1 Corinthians 13. The classic passage on humility, though it never uses the word, is Matthew 5:2–12, popularly known as the Beatitudes. And just as 1 Corinthians describes love, so the Beatitudes describe humility. Jesus began His teaching with, “Blessed are the poor in spirit” (Matt. 5:3). The poor in spirit are those who have become convinced of their spiritual poverty. They see their continued sinfulness even as believers. In contrast to the self-righteous … View Resource

  • Jesus’ Childhood Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008 | Matthew 2

    Matthew 2, along with a few verses in Luke 2, provides all the historical data we have concerning the early childhood of Jesus. And since the writers of the Gospels were masters of brevity and understatement, Matthew 2 fairly bristles with questions we long to have answered. Among them we’d like to know more about the wise men, the star they saw, and how they connected it to the one who was born king of the Jews. Obviously, if the Holy Spirit had wanted us to have more information, He would have guided Matthew to include it. So rather than being … View Resource

  • Designed for Dignity Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2007

    Baked ham or turkey is a traditional favorite on the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner tables of most American homes. And many of us enjoy an occasional steak or Sunday pot roast. For thousands of years, humanity as a whole has feasted on fish or fowl or various animals. Until the rise of the animal rights movement in recent years, no one has questioned the legitimacy of killing these creatures for food.  Yet, in most cultures, from the dawn of time murder of another human being has been a punishable crime. Why is this? Why do we distinguish between the … View Resource