• Good News and Good Deeds Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    The writer of the letter to the Hebrews exhorts us to “consider how to stir up one another to love and good works” (Heb. 10:24). In other words, we are to carefully ponder or study how we might encourage or stimulate each other to love God and our neighbor, in fulfillment of the two great commands that Jesus gives in Matthew 22:37–40. Authentic love for God and neighbor is not a mere warming of our affections, however, but as the writer of Hebrews assumes, always manifests itself in good deeds. Of course, this command to encourage others applies … View Resource

  • Christian Parenting Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2012

    Allie was having a rough night. She had already been disciplined once for slapping one of the pastor’s sons across the face, and she had just done it again, this time to his brother. Her mother was humiliated and frustrated. Allie was angry, ashamed, and hopeless as she sat in her room awaiting the consequences. When her mom went to speak with her, Allie cried, “I don’t deserve to be out there with my friends.” How would you have answered her? Practically every parent on the planet has had a conversation with a child about the impropriety of hitting … View Resource

  • Young Women, Idolatry & the Powerful Gospel Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    We are all inveterate worshipers — it’s just something we do without thinking about it. Worshiping is part of our nature because God created us to worship Him, and, by doing so, we bring both Him and ourselves deep pleasure (Pss. 16:11; 149:4). The world is full of worshipers, and some of them actually worship God. But the truth is that most of us worship idols. It’s easy to identify idols that exist outside of us — like statues of Buddha, fast cars, or beautiful houses. Pinpointing the idols that reside within is a little trickier, however. These … View Resource

  • The Gospel Cure Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    Upon brief reflection it’s easy to see that the remedy du jour for treating depression solely with medication is based upon very specific assumptions: that its genesis is always within the body (primarily the brain) and that we do not have an inner, invisible mind that directs brain activity. If that is true, then anesthetizing uncomfortable feelings is the wisest choice. However, if Scripture teaches something different, specifically that we have both a brain and a mind (or inner man), then categorizing depression solely as a dysfunction of the brain and turning to medicine first (thereby silencing the emotional voice … View Resource