• How Should We Remember? Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    I remember it so distinctly from my childhood—that early-morning glow on the doorframe of my father’s study. I had just stumbled out of bed and was still groggy. As I would come around the corner into the kitchen, I’d turn and see on the far end of the room that his light was already on, streaming into the hallway. Dad was reading Tabletalk and poring over his Bible, remembering the promises of God. Over the years, he had made a habit of making a beeline for God’s Word first thing in the morning, to hear His voice … View Resource

  • How to Stay Christian in Seminary Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    The point is this.” I love it when Paul says that in 2 Corinthians 9:6. He makes sure he has our attention and tells it straight. Behind the reasoned prose and the rhetorical flourishes, here’s what he’s getting at—plain, simple, straightforward. “The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.” Beautifully direct. The same humble approach helps when we take up the topic of “staying Christian” in seminary. There is so much (good) advice to be given. There are many experiences to be relayed, warnings to be … View Resource

  • The “Nonsense” of Justifying the Ungodly Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    There are at least three problems with N.T. Wright’s claim that imputing God’s righteousness to a defendant is a category mistake and “makes no sense.” First, Wright’s definition of the righteousness of God is too shallow. He fails to go to the heart of the matter and stays at the level of what divine righteousness does rather than what it is. View Resource

  • Served by God, Serving Man Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    My dad hasn’t been to seminary. He has no formal theological training. Nobody pays him and Mom for their endless hours serving the church. But they could write an article on sacrificial service to the church. They’ve lived it. Pop is a dentist in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He and Mom moved to town in the late seventies after dental school and a couple years practicing on marines. They didn’t know anyone when they arrived. They visited churches, soon found one, and have been there for over three decades now. I remember Pop giving all day Saturday to referee church basketball … View Resource