• What is the goal of reformation? Question and Answer

    Romans 1

    FERGUSON: Both in Calvin and in the Westminster Confession and its subordinate standards the answer to the first question, “What is our chief end?” must be the same as to the question, “What is the goal of Reformation?” The answer is, “To glorify God and to enjoy Him forever.” To be able to do both of these things simultaneously is what I think at the end of the day is going to make an impact on our contemporary world that is so interested in enjoyment. It’s very rare to hear non-Christians say, “See how these Christians enjoy the glory of … View Resource

  • Are there distinctions of sin in hell? Question and Answer

    Romans 2:5

    SPROUL: I think the New Testament makes it clear. There are at least twenty-five references in the New Testament that speak of the various degrees of punishment and/or reward in heaven relative to the degrees of sinfulness of sin. Even though all sin is sin, there is still a clear distinction in the New Testament between those sins that are covered, the multitude of sins that love covers—the Roman Catholic distinction between “mortal” and “venial” is not something that we would hold, but it’s a distinction that we would agree with in part, that at least there is a difference … View Resource

  • Are our hearts still deceitfully wicked after we are born again? Question and Answer

    Romans 8

    First of all, we understand immediately why the unregenerate heart is desperately wicked and beyond our understanding. That is how we can understand and interpret the headlines around us. Frankly, that’s how we can understand the mirror in front of us. It is the knowledge of depravity, the heart as the seat of sin. We can thoroughly understand that in terms of the unregenerate heart. It has to be affirmed comprehensively. Desperately wicked, Who can understand it? Remember, a part of the new covenant is being promised a new heart. In one sense the answer is no. It’s not the … View Resource

  • What does it mean for us to call God our Father? Question and Answer

    Romans 8:17

    One of the most well-known statements of the Christian faith is the Lord’s Prayer, which begins with the words “Our Father which art in heaven.” This is part of the universal treasury of Christendom. When I hear Christians in a private gathering praying individually, almost every single person begins their prayer by addressing God as Father. There’s nothing more common among us than to address God as our Father. So central is this to our Christian experience that in the nineteenth century, there were some who said the basic essence of the whole Christian religion can be reduced to two … View Resource