• The Word of the Lord through Micah Devotional

    Micah 1

    Scripture is clear that all sin begins with false worship (Rom. 1:18–32). Therefore, recognizing the idols and false worship behind our other sins advances our sanctification. At root, all sin manifests a desire to get what we want apart from the God who is, leading us to create all manner of idols that promise but can never satisfy. Moreover, those who persist in impenitent idolatry will feel the Lord’s wrath. Let us reject all idols and pursue ultimate satisfaction in Christ alone. View Resource

  • Hearing What we Want to Hear Devotional

    Micah 2

    Leaders continue to take advantage of the nations they are supposed to serve, using the legal system to their advantage at the expense of the powerless. In the United States, we see this all the time when unscrupulous businessmen lobby for regulations intended purely to drive their smaller competitors out of business and when eminent domain is invoked to force people out of property their families have owned for generations. Let us not be a party to such things. View Resource

  • The Exaltation of God’s Mountain Devotional

    Micah 4:1–5

    The world will worship Yahweh, the one true Lord of all. That is the conclusion of the Bible in many places, including today’s passage. Thus, we must eagerly pray for this day to arrive, and we must never think that any race, nation, or individual is so far gone as to be irredeemable. Death alone marks the point at which salvation is no longer possible. May we long for the conversion of the nations to Christ, and work to that end with our time, talents, and treasures. View Resource

  • The Ruler from Bethlehem Devotional

    Micah 5:1–5

    The scribes in Matthew 2:1–6 answer Herod with an interpretive gloss that says Bethlehem is not the least of the clans of Judah because of the Messiah. Though many of them would reject Jesus, this interpretive reading implicitly recognizes the truth that humble Bethlehem’s status would be changed forever because of the Messiah’s birth there. In turn, the Messiah’s origin in Bethlehem shows us that God exalts the humble and humbles those who exalt themselves. View Resource

  • A Small Town, a Great King Devotional

    Micah 5:1–6

    God’s often uses what the world deems insignificant or unlovely. Across the world, His kingdom is spread by ordinary people who will probably themselves never be famous or remembered in the history books of men. Yet, those who know Christ are remembered by God and are the most significant people of all in His eyes, the only eyes that really matter. Each one of us, famous or not, can be used by the Lord in mighty ways. View Resource

  • The Purpose of Wisdom Literature Devotional

    Micah 5:1-9

    Scripture tells us again and again that God delights to humble those who have exalted themselves and exalt those who have humbled themselves. His choice of Bethlehem is an example of this principle. The Lord chose a small, overlooked town as the birthplace of the King of kings and Lord of lords. None of us should therefore think that we are so insignificant that God cannot use us. He can use even ordinary people to do extraordinary things. View Resource

  • Justice, Kindness, and Humility Devotional

    Micah 6:1–8

    Matthew Henry comments, “The legal sacrifices had their virtue from the reference they had to Christ the great propitiation; but otherwise, of themselves, it was impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.” While people believe that mere sacrifices appease God, they cannot benefit from Jesus’ work. Along with an outward profession, we must have an inner possession of trust in Christ; otherwise, we are not in Him, and if we are not in Him, we cannot be saved. View Resource

  • Micah’s Trust in the Lord Devotional

    Micah 7:1–10

    As God’s people were surrounded by their enemies, Israel and Judah often heard these nations asking, “Where is the LORD your God?” (Mic. 7:10a). Because these enemies conquered Canaan with little resistance, they thought Yahweh was absent from His people. But Micah saw that the faithful remnant would one day look on these enemies after the Lord trampled them underfoot (v. 10b). That is our hope, for at the last day Christ will set His people over their foes (2 Tim. 2:11–12a). View Resource

  • The Forgiveness of Sins Devotional

    Micah 7:18–19

    Those whom God forgives are forgiven indeed. He does not actually forget what we have done, but He no longer holds our wickedness against us when we trust in Christ. Through the blood of Christ, He sees us as righteous and acceptable in His sight, and He will not take this status from us. We find it hard not to hold the sins of others against them, but the Lord readily and easily refuses to hold our sins against us if we are in Christ. View Resource