• Is it biblical to say God “loves you” to believers and nonbelievers alike? Question and Answer

    Matthew 5:45

    Historically and theologically, we distinguish among three types of divine love. There is God’s love of benevolence, where God has a kind spirit to the whole world. His benevolent will and love fall on everybody. There is also the sense in which the love of God is defined in terms of God’s love of beneficence, which refers not just simply to His attitude toward the world, but how He displays that goodness universally. “The rain falls upon the just as well as on the unjust” (Matt. 5:45). So that universal dimension of the love of God is manifest. When we’re … View Resource

  • What does it mean for us to call God our Father? Question and Answer

    Matthew 6:9

    One of the most well-known statements of the Christian faith is the Lord’s Prayer, which begins with the words “Our Father which art in heaven.” This is part of the universal treasury of Christendom. When I hear Christians in a private gathering praying individually, almost every single person begins their prayer by addressing God as Father. There’s nothing more common among us than to address God as our Father. So central is this to our Christian experience that in the nineteenth century, there were some who said the basic essence of the whole Christian religion can be reduced to two … View Resource

  • How should Christians respond to the COVID-19 crisis? Question and Answer

    Matthew 6:31-32

    I think we should be the most balanced, the most stable, the most sane, the most reasonable, and the most rational. Even beyond that, of course, we have a living hope. We know where we’re headed. Eternity is settled for us. It’s far better to depart and be with Christ (Phil. 1:23), so the worst that could ever happen to us would be the best that could ever happen to us. This is a time for us to make manifest our faith. Yesterday was Sunday. We weren’t allowed to have anybody here, but I preached anyway on Matthew 6, where … View Resource

  • What should I do if my career has become an idol? Question and Answer

    Matthew 6:33

    Personally, as a pastor, I regularly “resign” the church in my prayer time. There are obviously sinful things of the world that can become idols in the heart, but there are also good things that can become idols. In believing prayer, as we worship God, as we confess our sins to God, as we are bringing our needs to God, there is a constant offering of ourselves and the temptations of our hearts to God. Those temptations of our hearts are not just sinful things, but good things. In Philippians 3, Paul gives a list of his pre-Christian life. These … View Resource

  • Can I know that I am saved? Question and Answer

    Matthew 7:21-23

    The question of assurance is one of the biggest questions for many Christians. I dealt with that with an older saint this past Sunday evening. After the sermon, we spent some time together talking. We had a wonderful conversation really struggling with that question. This question that many Christians ask was a question I asked for many years of my life, and I couldn’t find a good resource on it. I couldn’t find something helpful that dealt with the theology of assurance. So, I put together a little book with some friends, to which Dr. Sproul wrote the forward, called … View Resource

  • How is limited atonement true when Scripture teaches that Christ died for the whole world? Question and Answer

    Matthew 7:22-23

    We know Jesus is the Savior of the world because there’s only one Savior for the world. The world has only one Savior, but we also know the atonement is limited. We all know that, right? The atonement is limited because people go to hell. Jesus said in the Sermon on the Mount: “Many will say to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ and I will say to them, ‘Depart from Me, you workers of iniquity. I never knew you’” (Matt. 7:22–23). Jesus talked more about hell then He did about heaven. We know that hell is a reality, and we know people … View Resource

  • How should I preach the doctrines of grace? Question and Answer

    Matthew 11:25-30

    I think, pastorally, one must always recognize that in some of these areas people do not have the paradigms to be able immediately to take in what Scripture teaches. Sometimes they have been taught in a way that is contrary to the doctrines of grace. So I usually say to younger men, or men who are younger than myself, “One of the best things to do with someone you think really is a Christian is sit down with them or preach to them with this question in mind, ‘How did Jesus think about this?’” Because sometimes people think they have … View Resource

  • What is blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? Question and Answer

    Matthew 12:31-32

    THOMAS: Interestingly enough, we talked a little bit about this today in a course that I was teaching here for Ligonier. We talked about the change of view that has taken place since the Puritan period in the seventeenth century. At that time, the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit was a definite sin. It was a definite, existential moment in a person’s life when they said “No” to the gospel or “No” to the work of the Holy Spirit. I was pointing out that Martyn Lloyd-Jones, I think in Preaching and Preachers, said that this was what troubled his congregation … View Resource

  • Why did Jesus speak in parables? Question and Answer

    Matthew 13:11-17

    He actually answers that question Himself, or gives one answer to it, when He tells the parable of the sower and the soils and His disciples don’t get it. They come to Him and say, “What was that all about?” and He explains it to them. He says, “I’m giving these explanations to you because you’re my disciples. But one of the reasons I tell these parables is because when I tell the parables it actually makes clear whether people really grasp the meaning of the kingdom or not” (see Matt. 13:11-17, Mark 4:10-12, or Luke 8:9-10). I don’t know … View Resource

  • How did the early church fathers interpret the “rock” of Matthew 16? Question and Answer

    Matthew 16:18

    I would say if this were the lightning round we could say, true. The notion that Peter himself was the rock rather than his confession being the rock seems first to be articulated by a bishop of Rome in the third century. Now, the third century is very early relative to us, but it’s a long time after Jesus—two hundred and fifty years after Jesus. And this is a sort of solitary point of view of the bishop of Rome initially, not even followed up by all later bishops of Rome in the ancient church period. So yes, I think, … View Resource

  • How can Christians live as lights in a dark time? Question and Answer

    Matthew 22:39

    CHARLES: A couple of things come to my mind. One is what Burk mentioned, which is the second great command that Jesus gives—to love your neighbor as yourself (Matt. 22:39). We, as shepherds in our church, have been trying to think through decisions in a way that reflects that priority for the members of our church so that we, as a church, are reflecting how to love our neighbor in this critical time. It is not just about our own safety, security, priorities, comfort, or whatever you would add to that list. There is a love of neighbor that motivates … View Resource

  • Are we living in the end times described in the book of Revelation? Question and Answer

    Matthew 24:34

    Yes and no. Lest you think I’ve fallen into neo-orthodoxy and paradoxical theology, let me explain. In one sense, everything that takes place after the ascension of Christ takes place in the end times. The end times started in the New Testament. We’re still in the end times. Now, I presume you’re asking whether we are at the end of the end times so that we are coming close to the return of Jesus as it was set forth in the book of Revelation. One of the big questions in understanding and interpreting the book of Revelation is tied to … View Resource

  • How do you carry out discipleship and evangelism in your church? Question and Answer

    Matthew 28:18-20

    First of all, we are an unapologetically preaching and teaching church. That is the starting place for us, and it’s key to the disciple-making process. The Great Commission teaches us that we are to go and make disciples of all the nations, then mark them as disciples by baptizing them, and then after that, it’s just one long process of “teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you” (Matt. 28:18–20). There are a lot of things that churches get involved in to draw crowds, but to make disciples there must be a heavy emphasis on teaching the Word … View Resource

  • What is the Great Commission, and what can we gain from Ligonier’s teaching series on this subject? Question and Answer

    Matthew 28:18-20

    PARSONS: In our study of Romans at Saint Andrew’s Chapel, I took some time to look at the mission of God in Scripture. The mission of God is something I could spend the rest of my life studying because I can’t read a page of Scripture without seeing it. There is so much there when you look at the Great Commission and how it ties together so much of what we see from Genesis, from God’s promise to Abraham, and so on. Of course, I deal with some of that in the series on the Great Commission. I dealt … View Resource

  • Should all Christians pursue missions? Question and Answer

    Matthew 28:18-20

    It is good to hear that there are young people out there pursuing missions because that’s a pursuit the Lord has placed upon the church. We all are responsible for the fulfillment of the Great Commission (Matt. 28:18–20). Whether one is actually going as a missionary or contributing to that endeavor, all of us are responsible to fulfill the Great Commission because Christ is Lord. Because He is Lord, we have to do what He commands us to do. So I would encourage all Christians, not just young people, to make a priority of missions. This … View Resource