• Paradise Created Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008 | Genesis 2

    Even people who are not familiar with the Bible have heard of Adam and Eve. Perhaps they have seen Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam or have read John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Many, however, also know that Adam and Eve play an important role in the opening chapters of the Bible. Some also know that the Bible teaches that Adam had something to do with the evil and misery that we witness in the world and in ourselves every day. Just what did Adam do? How did his action come to affect us and our daily lives? Let us turn to the … View Resource

  • The Purpose of Labor and Rest Article by Miles Van Pelt

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    What’s the point of labor and rest? Asking this question is like asking, “What’s the point of breathing?” Like breathing, the cycle of labor and rest is essential to life, embedded in the created order, ceases at death, and begins again for all believers after our resurrection to eternal life. The whole of life is taken up with the rhythm of labor and rest. We labor and rest each day, each week, each year, and each season of life. This is no accident. It is the divine design. In fact, labor and rest are part of the divine … View Resource

  • The Right Balance Article by Scott Redd

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    One of the first things we learn about work is that we are to regularly stop doing it (Gen. 2:1-3). The creation account of Genesis 1 culminates in the Lord’s setting aside His creative labors in order to rest. That divine rest becomes a model for those made in the image of this working-and-resting God, which means that all humanity is likewise called to regularly rest from daily labor (Ex. 20:8-11; Deut. 5:12-15). Human rest is first presented to us as God’s rest. He completes His creative work, sits back, looks at it, declares that … View Resource

  • A Well-Spent Sabbath Article by David Strain

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    For a few people today, an hour or two on Sunday mornings is occupied with public worship, but for most people, the idea that Sunday is the Christian Sabbath—an entire day set apart for worship, rest, and ministry—is entirely novel. And yet, in an age of frenetic and unrelenting busyness, when technology allows us to stay plugged in to the world twenty-four-seven, when entertainment becomes the de facto purpose of so many lives, nothing could be more countercultural, nor bear more eloquent testimony to a Christian’s citizenship in another world, than a well-spent Lord’s Day. Growing up in … View Resource