• A Call to Maturity Article by Robert Carver

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    To what shall I compare this generation?” So spoke a man in His early thirties about the generation in which He lived. It was occasioned by an expression of doubt by another individual about the same age—one of the finest of that generation, a man specially prepared for a unique posture of service to that generation. This incident is recorded in Matthew 11. John the Baptist, imprisoned because of his rebuke of Herod Antipas’ adulterous marriage, had begun to entertain uncertainties as to whether Jesus was the promised Messiah after all. In messianic compassion, Jesus responded to John’s inquiries … View Resource

  • Emulating Our Elders Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    The ancient Greek philosopher Socrates is often quoted as having said: “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” The quote is almost certainly apocryphal, but it resonates with generations of human experience. Throughout history, older generations have peered over the rims of their spectacles … View Resource

  • One Family Under God Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    He was asking a question that I had heard multiple times during my years as a pastor: “Do you have children’s church?” This time, instead of giving an extensive explanation for our practice of not segregating our church worship gatherings by ages, I decided to give a brief and accurate yet intentionally provocative answer. Here’s how it went: “Yes, we do. Every Sunday.” “Great. Can you describe how it is structured?” “Sure. We have singing, prayer, Scripture reading, giving, and teaching. We also observe the Lord’s Supper monthly, and periodically we observe baptism.” “That sounds interesting. Are … View Resource

  • Youth-Driven Culture Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    Maybe it began earlier than the 1950s and 60s, but those decades seem to mark the rise of the fascination with youth in American culture. The famous line that celebrates all things young, often wrongly attributed to James Dean, declares, “Live fast, die young, and leave a good-looking corpse behind.” Popular music, that telling barometer of popular culture, has kept pace with this trend. Nearly every heavy-metal band of the 1980s and ‘90s had a stock ballad about young heroes going down in a “blaze of glory.” Other popmusic references stress the invincible power of youth. Rod Stewart sings of … View Resource

  • Tell Us Your Stories Article by Collin Hansen

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    Sometimes younger Christians give the impression that we have things figured out. We’re the future. We’ve found the old methods wanting, so we’ve developed new ones. We’re the generation that will strike the right balance where our forebears fell over to one side or the other. We’ve learned from your mistakes. And we don’t mind telling you. View Resource

  • Teenage Rebellion Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2009

    Let’s do a quick word association test. What is the first thing that comes into your mind when you see or hear the word teenager? Sadly, for many, the first words that come to mind are entirely negative. The word teenager brings to their mind other words such as lazy, apathetic, irresponsible, rude, know-it-all, and so on. Most people today have very low expectations for teenagers in general, and too many have low expectations for their own teenagers in particular. Teenagers themselves recognize these low expectations, and many live down to them — sleeping in and sliding by. Not all … View Resource

  • Peer Pressure Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2007

    The talk shows were buzzing recently about a sex education class in a Maryland school that had students chew a stick of gum, then pass it around so that everyone in the class chewed it. This learning activity was supposed to make some kind of point, never specified, about sexually-transmitted diseases. It turns out, this gross-out exercise was not the brainchild of some left-wing progressive educational theorist. The communal gum-chewing was sponsored by a Christian “faith-based” group that was allowed to come into the classroom to teach about abstinence.  In fact, the “gum game” has its origins in … View Resource