• How Do I Teach My Family? Article by Jon Payne

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    Every Christian home is meant to be a school of Christ—a place of spiritual nurture, loving discipline, sound doctrine, and biblical piety. This is not a reference to Victorian-era portraits of the Christian family; it is the clear teaching of Scripture and the Reformed tradition. Even so, our hectic schedules, ubiquitous gadgets, and misplaced priorities often make our homes similar to those of our unbelieving neighbors. God becomes an afterthought. Here are three things to remember as we seek to build God-centered homes where sound doctrine is the foundation and our Lord Jesus Christ is the cornerstone. First, we must … View Resource

  • The Purpose of Labor and Rest Article by Miles Van Pelt

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    What’s the point of labor and rest? Asking this question is like asking, “What’s the point of breathing?” Like breathing, the cycle of labor and rest is essential to life, embedded in the created order, ceases at death, and begins again for all believers after our resurrection to eternal life. The whole of life is taken up with the rhythm of labor and rest. We labor and rest each day, each week, each year, and each season of life. This is no accident. It is the divine design. In fact, labor and rest are part of the divine … View Resource

  • Always Changing? Article by William W. Goligher

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014 | 1 Corinthians 14

    The phrase semper reformanda has been translated to mean “always changing” and hijacked in the interests of change for the sake of change. To many, this means that everything—from what we believe to how we conduct ourselves in a fast-changing culture to the way we “do church”—is subject to review and reinvention in every generation. It used to be liberal Christians who used the phrase to justify their adjustment of the message to the times, but now evangelicals argue that it is essential to the survival of Christianity that we keep up with the changing culture if we are … View Resource

  • In Awe of God’s Glory: An Interview with Joel Beeke Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    Tabletalk: At what age did you first hear God’s call to ministry, and how did you receive confirmation of this call? Joel Beeke: God began to strive with my soul when I was age fourteen. I was brought to spiritual liberty in Christ when I was fifteen. And I was irresistibly and powerfully called to the ministry when I was sixteen. Being quite shy when I was young, and belonging to a denomination where the next youngest minister was nearly fifty years old, I never would have considered the possibility of ministry had I not been powerfully called. My … View Resource

  • Ordinary Means Article by Michael G. Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Nowadays, ordinary is a bad word. In a culture that is constantly looking for the next big thing, who wants what is ordinary? We want the spectacular. We want what is bigger, better, and exciting. We desire extraordinary gadgets, extraordinary kids, and extraordinary lives. To feel validated as a person, one must not settle for what is ordinary. Our approach to church is not much different. In a world that values novelty, innovation, and relevance, the expectation is for pastors to appear hip, worship to feel amazing, and teaching to be useful for our most recent news feed of felt … View Resource

  • Created to Praise Article by Andrew Peterson

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2013

    My little sister used to whisper to herself. On family road trips, in the olden days when kids wore no seatbelts, I lounged on the dash of the rear window and listened to my parents’ conversation in the front seat, audible mainly as the soothing susurrus (whisper) of my mother’s soft replies. It often lulled me to sleep, especially when I couldn’t quite make out what they were saying. But sometimes I noticed, out of the corner of my eye, my little sister Sharon staring out the window and mouthing the last thing anyone said. “We’ll be … View Resource

  • Theology and Doxology Article by Gerrit Scott Dawson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Angelic beings approach the throne of the triune God. They arrive in His immediate presence because they need no mediator. No sin prevents them from entering, and God gave these creatures the capacity to draw near without being incinerated by His glory. Is it safe to say these angels know better than we do? But what do these knowledgeable ones do in God’s presence? According to Revelation 4:10, they fall down, cast their crowns, and sing. In short, they worship God with their whole beings. I read a lot of theology books. That’s my job—and my passion … View Resource

  • Sight, Place, and the Presence of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    A great debate and controversy over what is proper worship before God is going on in our time. As I have wrestled with this question, I keep going back to the Old Testament. I know this is a dangerous practice because we now live in the New Testament era, but the Old Testament gives detailed, explicit instructions for worship, whereas the New Testament is almost silent on the conduct of worship. In the Old Testament, I find a refuge from speculation, from human opinion, and from the vagaries of human taste and preference because there I find God Himself explicitly … View Resource

  • God-Centered Prayer Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2012

    It is easy to be critical of prayer, particularly the prayers of others. Robert Murray McCheyne’s words are often cited because they remain painfully true: “You wish to humble a man? Ask him about his prayer life.” Our prayers reveal much about us. Prayers with little or no worship and focusing on our needs (usually health) reveal a distorted, Adamic bent. What they reveal is self-centeredness, what Martin Luther labeled homo in se incurvatus: “man curved in on himself.” Listen to prayers at the church prayer meeting (if one still exists). You will discover that the majority of prayers … View Resource

  • God-Centered Worship Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2012

    One of the most important questions a person can ever ask is “Whom or what am I worshipping?” In Romans 1:21–23, Paul says that to worship anything or anyone other than the true God is evidence of futile thinking, a darkened heart, and the abandonment of wisdom. When fallen man — apart from Christ — is most religious, he is most rebellious. One of God’s purposes in redeeming sinners is the recovery of His true worship (see John 4:21—24). As Christians, we count it both our duty and delight to worship the God who has saved us … View Resource

  • Theology and Doxology Article by Michael Haykin

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2012

    In December 1967, D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones gave an address to what was then known as the Puritan Conference, speaking on what some might have considered an esoteric topic: the teachings of a small eighteenth-century movement known as Sandemanianism. Ever a believer in the value of church history for guidance in the present, Lloyd-Jones argued that the errors of this movement had much to teach his hearers, for he felt that there were far too many in contemporary evangelical circles who were replicating the central Sandemanian error, namely, that true faith can be held without deeply felt affections. Robert Sandeman, the … View Resource

  • Amen Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    And all the people said … “Amen!” The “amen corner” has had an important place in the life of the church throughout the ages. However, it is rare to find such a spot among Presbyterians. We are known as God’s frozen chosen for a reason. It has been said that the Methodists like to shout “Fire,” the Baptists like to shout “Water,” and the Presbyterians like to softly say, “Order, order.” Nevertheless, in spite of the idiosyncrasies of various ecclesiastical persuasions, the function of the word amen far transcends denominational usages in the modern era. The term amen was used … View Resource

  • Worship Article by Mark Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    God created us to worship him, which is His prerogative as God (Ps. 95:6; Rev. 4:11; 14:7). Humans are at their best when they are worshipping the triune God, just as they are at their worst when they are worshipping anything or anyone else. In English, “worship” derives from the old English word weorthscipe, which means acknowledgment of worth (Rev. 4:9-11; 5:2). The Greek word proskuneĊ means “to fall down” (Acts 10:25), and in Hebrew, shachahmeans to “bow down” (Ex. 24:1). However, the root meaning of these words does not give us … View Resource

  • The Gospel and Worship Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    There may be nothing in the realm of religion by which people vainly attempt to establish their acceptability to God more than by acts of public or private worship. As a result, worship can degrade into one of the most legalistic activities a person can pursue. In the minds of many, you are right with God if you go to church. They are convinced that anyone who worships God is accepted by Him. Though perhaps they do not expressly state it, they believe that because they discipline themselves to regularly attend an event where the gospel is proclaimed, they have … View Resource

  • Young Women, Idolatry & the Powerful Gospel Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    We are all inveterate worshipers — it’s just something we do without thinking about it. Worshiping is part of our nature because God created us to worship Him, and, by doing so, we bring both Him and ourselves deep pleasure (Pss. 16:11; 149:4). The world is full of worshipers, and some of them actually worship God. But the truth is that most of us worship idols. It’s easy to identify idols that exist outside of us — like statues of Buddha, fast cars, or beautiful houses. Pinpointing the idols that reside within is a little trickier, however. These … View Resource