• Listening to the World Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Christians should listen to the Word of God, of course, in the sense of heeding it, following it, and taking it in. Listening to the competing voices of the world in that way can get us into trouble. But there is another sense in which we do need to listen to what the world is saying. Paying attention can help us avoid the world’s errors and can make us more effective witnesses and evangelists. The Bible commends King David’s allies from the tribe of Issachar, “men who had understanding of the times, to know what Israel ought to … View Resource

  • One or Two? Article by Peter Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    An ideology is taking over the West that is both very spiritual and self-consciously anti-Christian. It intends, ever so subtly, without ever saying so explicitly, to grind the gospel into the dustbin of history. The 1960s was an incredibly formative decade. In 1962, Mircea Eliade, the world expert on comparative religions, observed: “Western thought [he meant Christendom] can no longer maintain itself in this splendid isolation from a confrontation with the ‘unknown,’ the ‘outsiders.’” As if on cue, the “Fab Four” met the Maharishi and introduced the “wisdom of the East” to popular Western culture. In the same … View Resource

  • Blame It on Babylon Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    In the book of Revelation, Babylon is a symbol of all that’s wrong in the world. It’s the system, the way things are in a sinful creation. Babylon is worldliness. If you study Revelation 17, you’ll notice three things about the prostitute Babylon. First, she is attractive. She has royal clothes, purple and scarlet. She glitters with gold and is decked out in pearls and precious stones. She’s got her best threads on, alluring and seductive. Second, the influence of Babylon is pervasive. She sits on many waters, which are peoples, multitudes, nations, and languages (Rev. 17:15). Babylon the … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 1) Article by R.C. Sproul

    What is the Christian’s role in the scientific enterprise? How do we as Christians live in a culture that has been shaped and influenced by the impact of scientific accomplishments? Lest we slip into critical attitudes toward science, we must remember that science began with a mandate God gave in creation. God commanded Adam and Eve to have dominion over the earth and to subdue it. There is a sense in which man was created to conquer the universe in which he lives. The scientific enterprise is a part of that task. At the same time, certain restrictions and … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 3) Article by R.C. Sproul

    (Continued from The Christian and Science pt. 2)  Christians Need Not Fear Scientific Inquiry There is a sense in which the Christian should be the most passionate scientist of all because he should be rigorously open to truth wherever it is found. He should not be afraid that a new discovery of something that is true will destroy his foundation for truth. If our foundation for truth is true, all other truth can only support it and enhance it. It can’t destroy it. Therefore, Christians ought not to be afraid of scientific inquiry. This does not mean that … View Resource

  • Tevje Needed to Know Article by Joel Belz

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    An eery discomfort links the two famous questions. Tevje, in Fiddler on the Roof, bluntly asks his wife: “Do you love me?” How can it not remind you of Jesus, in John 21, using the very same words to put Peter on the spot: “Do you love me?” View Resource

  • The Key to C.S. Lewis Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    C.S. Lewis was not only a Christian apologist and lay theologian. He was also an unusually imaginative and creative novelist. And in his day job at Oxford and then Cambridge he was an astonishingly perceptive and influential literary scholar. At a time when the modernist literary establishment was obsessed with depressingly bleak realistic fiction, Lewis sent readers’ imaginations soaring in his Chronicles of Narnia. While the modernists were looking down their noses at popular genre fiction, Lewis was writing the provocative science fiction of his Space Trilogy. In his apologetic and theological writing, Lewis was surprising both non-believers and … View Resource

  • A Supernatural Faith Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    The God hypothesis is no longer necessary to explain the origin of the universe or the development of human life.” This assertion was at the very heart of the movement that took place in the eighteenth century that we call the Enlightenment or the Aufklärung. This movement spread from Germany to France and then to England. The French Encyclopedists (writers of an encyclopedia during the eighteenth century that promoted secular humanism) were militant in their denial of the need for the existence of God. His existence was seen as no longer necessary because He had been supplanted by the … View Resource

  • Theology Has Consequences

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    Richard Weaver first made a name for himself when he published his seminal work, Ideas Have Consequences. It is a brief work with ideas that are still reaping consequences. He was to the secular academic world something of a Francis Schaeffer, introducing thousands to the concept of worldview, arguing that what we think about little things, more often than not, is determined by what we think about big things. Weaver demonstrated how a modernist worldview was not something academia simply studied, but it was instead something that shaped academia. Indeed, modernism is academia’s mother. You wouldn’t have the latter if … View Resource