• Faith and Works Article by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014 | Genesis 15

    Some years ago, I read an article in which the author argued rather vigorously against the teaching that believers are justified by grace alone through faith alone on account of the work of Christ alone. According to this author, the single reference to “faith alone” in the New Testament is found in the words of James 2:24: “You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone.” How, the author wrote, could it not be more clear that Abraham, who is the exemplar of one whose faith was “credited to him for righteousness” (Gen. 15 … View Resource

  • Paradise Created Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008 | Genesis 2

    Even people who are not familiar with the Bible have heard of Adam and Eve. Perhaps they have seen Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam or have read John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Many, however, also know that Adam and Eve play an important role in the opening chapters of the Bible. Some also know that the Bible teaches that Adam had something to do with the evil and misery that we witness in the world and in ourselves every day. Just what did Adam do? How did his action come to affect us and our daily lives? Let us turn to the … View Resource

  • Redemptive History Article by Richard Phillips

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    Even those casually familiar with the Bible know its basic contents: the Old Testament in front and the New Testament in back. Those more familiar know its contents more deeply. First is the Pentateuch (the five books of Moses), followed by the histories, the poetic books, and the prophets. In the New Testament, we find the Gospels, Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation. This describes how the church has organized the canon of the Bible’s books. But does Scripture present its own structure for understanding its message of salvation? As Reformed theologians have long observed, the Bible does provide such a … View Resource

  • Consistent Living Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Ask anyone to tell you what constitutes a good work, and it will not be too long before you receive a litany of responses. Helping to repair a widow’s leaky roof, giving shelter to the homeless, helping the local rescue mission serve hot meals on Thanksgiving Day, and many other physical expressions of goodness readily spring to mind when we think of the phrase “good work.” Certainly all of the things that I have listed can be considered good works. Helping the needy among us is of primary importance to our profession of faith (James 2:14–17). Our faith … View Resource

  • A Life of Faith Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    I remember trading Valentine’s Day cards in grade school. Every kid brought cards for the other kids in the class. We had made cut out card receivers and hung them on the wall in our school classroom. Sometimes, they even included candy with the card. It was a good day at school. Imagine being a little bit older than grade school, and imagine someone sending you a sweet Valentine card, someone who has said that they love you. But then, for some reason, they say bad things about you. They have said that they love you, but you now find … View Resource

  • Righteous Freedom Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2004

    The early sixteenth century witnessed a reformation regarding the role of Jesus’ goodness and faithfulness in redemption. But moments such as these — moments of clarity — rarely last that long. Within a generation, the righteousness of Christ was forced once again to share the stage with human goodness. Such decline in doctrine is by no means remarkable, and it should serve to remind us of an unfortunate truism in this fallen world. John Calvin knew it all too well. Hinting at his anxiety over the future of his home church in Geneva, he wrote, “It is not strange that … View Resource