• The Church is One Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2012

    In the seventeenth chapter of his gospel, the Apostle John recounts the most extensive prayer that is recorded in the New Testament. It is a prayer of intercession by Jesus for His disciples and for all who would believe through their testimony. Consequently, this prayer is called Jesus’ High Priestly Prayer. Christ implored the Father in this prayer that His people might be one. He went so far as to ask the Father that “they may be one even as we are one” (v. 22b). He desired that the unity of the people of God — the unity of the … View Resource

  • Covenant Community Article by David McKay

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    When a pastor looks at his assembled congregation, what does he see? If he accepts a biblical covenant theology, he knows that he is not looking at a collection of randomly gathered individuals, or even families, but at a part of the covenant people of God. That perspective, when grasped by a congregation, ought to make a great impact on how these people view their life together. Covenant theology reminds the people of God that they are to think covenantally rather than individualistically. Such a mindset is the very opposite of that which shapes much of current Western thinking. The … View Resource

  • Deeds Over Creeds Article by Gary L. W. Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    The English Reformer Hugh Latimer once remarked, “We ought never to regard unity so much that we would or should forsake God’s Word for her sake.” Wise words from a man who went to the stake, rather than compromise the truth of the gospel. To those whose only concern is the appearance of visible unity among all who call themselves Christians, Latimer’s resolve appears most unattractive. We are repeatedly told by those of this persuasion that the church’s major fault is its deplorable lack of visible unity. Appeal is constantly made to the words of Jesus in John 17, and … View Resource

  • Dividing Walls That Unite Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    Be not ashamed of your faith; remember it is the ancient gospel of the martyrs, confessors, reformers and saints. Above all, it is the truth of God, against which the gates of Hell cannot prevail. Let your lives adorn your faith, let your example adorn your creed.” These words from C.H. Spurgeon’s foreword to the Second London Baptist Confession of Faith are as poignant now as in 1855. As the church at the beginning of the twenty-first century, we desperately need to return to our historic creeds and confessions, and we need to remember the ancient gospel of our forefathers … View Resource

  • Division Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Volac, We have finished our review of your trainee evaluations. We congratulate you on your efficiency. Considering how many minions you have to supervise, it is quite a task to complete this much paperwork on top of your other responsibilities. We should also let you know that the director of Inhuman Resources was quite pleased to receive them on time. It appears that many of our trainees are enthusiastic about their task. They know that we are at war with the enemy, and that one of the most important strategies in any war is to divide and conquer. … View Resource

  • Many Gifts, One Body Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    A few years ago I was given a month-long sabbatical to study in Wittenberg, Germany, the birthplace of the Protestant Reformation. While in Wittenberg, I stayed at the Evangelical Preacher’s Seminary, which shared the same courtyard as Martin Luther’s home. From my room on the third floor, I overlooked the dining room and kitchen of Luther’s sixteenth-century house. I recall that on many occasions in the late evening after a traditional German meal, I would open my window to the courtyard and look at the walkway below that led to Luther’s house. I considered the floral surroundings that adorned the … View Resource

  • The Missing Motive Article by Eric Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    I am notoriously bad at remembering anniversaries, and last year it was quite a surprise to discover that 2008 marked the fiftieth anniversary of my ordination to the Christian ministry. Not that the occasion was other than memorable. Indeed it was a very special day for many reasons. View Resource

  • The Necessity of Reconciliation Article by Rod Mays

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    Why do relationships have to be so complicated? Why do good friends get “wrapped around the axle” with each other? Why do family members become so alienated they may not speak to one another for years? It is because we are sinners who are, by nature, enemies of God and of each other. However, the message of the Gospel is the message of reconciliation (that is, putting together divided parties; Jesus’ bringing God and man together). “In Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation” (2 … View Resource

  • Out of the Many, One Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    In the title “United States of America,” the emphasis is necessarily on the word united. When America was in its infancy and seeking to establish itself as a sovereign nation, it faced many challenges, not the least of which was that King George of England was not interested in letting his colonies in America go free. If these colonies were to establish themselves as a nation apart from British rule, they were going to have to do so by defeating the most powerful army on the earth, namely, the British Army. To do so, it would have to pull … View Resource

  • Schism and the Local Church Article by Michael G. Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Although the Great Schism occurred in the eleventh century, dealing with schismatic people in the local church has been a problem since the days of the apostles. Writing to the church at Corinth around AD 55, Paul said, “I appeal to you, brothers, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be united in the same mind and the same judgment. For it has been reported … that there is quarreling among you, my brothers” (1 Cor. 1:10–11). The word the apostle … View Resource

  • Set Free to Die Article by Joseph Pipa Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007

    Central to the practice of mortification is the believer’s union with Christ Jesus. In Romans 6:1–13, Paul shows the relationship of union with Christ to mortification. In Romans 6, the apostle is answering the objection that justification promotes sin. He teaches that the work of Christ on the cross, which is the basis for justification, is also the basis of sanctification.  Paul bases his argument on the believer’s union with Christ in His death and resurrection. He says, “For if we have become united with Him in the likeness of His death, certainly we shall be also in the likeness of … View Resource

  • That They May Be One Article by Carl Robbins

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2007

    No Christian would say he is for division in the church. Divisiveness stands condemned (1 Cor. 1:10). Even the newest believer knows that we are given warnings not to tolerate those who would cause division (Rom. 16:17–18; Titus 3:9–11). And any church that has division will certainly not be a healthy, growing church. Conversely, we know that the New Testament reveals a strong emphasis on unity and community in the church. As believers we have a declared unity: The church has one Head: Ephesians 1:22–23. Christ is building one church: Matthew 16:17–18. The church has one foundation: 1 Corinthians 3:11. … View Resource

  • That They May Be the One Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

      The Lord Jesus prayed on the night before His death: “I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, … View Resource

  • True Catholicism Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    We have all heard it said, and some of you have even said it: “Let’s just agree to disagree.” If memory serves me, I have never used that expression, primarily because I don’t think it makes much sense and because I think people who use the expression don’t make much sense when they use it in their attempt to end disagreements. Nevertheless, I think I know what people mean by the expression. As Christians, we agree that we disagree on certain biblical, doctrinal, and ecclesiastical matters. And while we all agree that the Bible is our only infallible rule for … View Resource

  • United in Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    During the second half of the twentieth century, post-Christian societies throughout the world began to shout the mantra “unity is god!” In attempting to liberate themselves from the truths upon which they were established, they bound themselves to a law that requires perfect compliance. Consequently, it has become necessary for every post-Christian society to promulgate its cause in accordance with this one code: “In unity we trust, in tolerance we flourish, and in pluralism we are free. Unity is god, and there is no god but unity.” It is the destiny of human societies to self-destruct, and it is the … View Resource