• Chief of Sinners Article by Terry Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2009

    How might we describe the psychology of Christian experience? Is it characterized by joy, peace, and contentment? Or is it characterized by lament, struggle, and holy discontent? Should I feel good about myself or bad about myself? Should I forget past failure and delight in present grace or continue to remind myself of the evidence of the depths of my depravity in my past record and present reality? What I hope you’ll say is: “Both!” But what I suspect most will say is the former and heaven forbid the latter. Look at any recent Christian advertising, whether for books … View Resource

  • The Heart of the Problem Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    The first and most important step in seeking a cure is an accurate diagnosis of the problem. Symptoms must be carefully interpreted so that underlying causes are not overlooked. Several years ago our nine-year-old daugter developed a severe pain in her elbow after a nasty fall. After probing that area of her arm and reviewing x-rays, the physician who examined her concluded that she had simply suffered a bad sprain. A week later, with the pain still lingering, a second doctor examined her. He reviewed her case for several minutes and then began probing Sarah’s wrist where he quickly discovered a previously … View Resource

  • Regarding Depravity Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    I have a high regard for the depravity of man. Without contest, the supreme sinfulness of sinners is the most disregarded reality — the world over. The fall of man is quite possibly the most forgotten, under appreciated, and misunderstood event in history. For this reason, many in our day preach “salvation” but neglect to preach sin; many talk about Christ but fail to talk about conviction; many offer testimonies about renewal but forget to mention repentance.  In our post postmodern society, you might get away with talking about Jesus with a Muslim; you might be able to have a … View Resource

  • Whose Opinion Really Matters? Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    I have confessed my addiction to news programming in this space before, and at the risk of sounding repetitious, I am going to do so again. When I was asked to write this article that reflects broadly on the themes for this month’s daily studies, I could not help but think about a phrase often repeated on the various “news analysis” programs that run on television. As different issues have been debated in recent months, it seems that there is one saying both conservative and liberal talking heads are willing to express. The words I am thinking of are, “Everyone … View Resource