• The Anchor of Theology Article by Janet Mefferd

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    Why aren’t Christian women interested in theology?” I often hear that question (usually from men), and I’m never sure how to answer. That’s likely because I can’t relate to the premise that Christian women aren’t interested in theology—the study of God. This wasn’t always true of me. If I’d heard that question when I was a college student, I probably would have answered, “Theology is for pastors. The most important thing is to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.” I had a lot to learn. At the time, my thinking about Christianity was … View Resource

  • Theology and Doxology Article by Gerrit Scott Dawson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Angelic beings approach the throne of the triune God. They arrive in His immediate presence because they need no mediator. No sin prevents them from entering, and God gave these creatures the capacity to draw near without being incinerated by His glory. Is it safe to say these angels know better than we do? But what do these knowledgeable ones do in God’s presence? According to Revelation 4:10, they fall down, cast their crowns, and sing. In short, they worship God with their whole beings. I read a lot of theology books. That’s my job—and my passion … View Resource

  • The High Cost of Ambivalence Article by Dan Dumas

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    Walking away from gospel orthodoxy or disconnecting from the stream of church history should strike terror in our hearts. But because of personal compromise, far too many believers are found “walking in the counsel of the wicked, standing in the path of sinners and seated with the scoffers” rather than defending the faith to the death. When was the last time you thought deeply about the consequences of “little” erroneous theological decisions that can subtly distort both your faith and practice? The Apostle Paul’s grave concern in 2 Corinthians 11:3 was that we would be so easily led astray … View Resource

  • Theological Narcissism Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2012

    According to Greek mythology, Narcissus was a hunter from Thespia renowned for his beauty. His enemy, Nemesis, lured the arrogant Narcissus to a pool of water where he gazed at his own reflection and became utterly infatuated with the image in the pool, not realizing it was his own reflection. Enraptured with himself, Narcissus could not escape the beauty of his own reflection and eventually died. We are all like Narcissus. We are infatuated with ourselves — obsessed with our own image. However, we’re not satisfied merely to bask in our own importance, we want everyone around us to be … View Resource

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary Christians, was influential and controversial in her day. She was burned at the stake in Paris in 1310, and her views were later condemned at the Council of Vienne in 1312. What got her in trouble was The Mirror of Simple Souls, Marguerite’s exploration on what she calls the seven states of grace. In the fifth and sixth states … View Resource

  • Idolizing Theology Article by Mark Ross

    Dearest Valefar, Your recent report has been received, and we do note your concern that things might have taken a turn for the worse. Perhaps they have, but we would not worry too much that your target has developed an almost insatiable thirst for theology. We do not say this can be ignored, but at the same time, we would caution you against any panic. If properly managed, you may find that this actually works to our advantage, not the enemy’s. The battle for a man’s soul can be fought in many ways. Head on, forceful confrontation by tempting him … View Resource

  • Tevje Needed to Know Article by Joel Belz

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    An eery discomfort links the two famous questions. Tevje, in Fiddler on the Roof, bluntly asks his wife: “Do you love me?” How can it not remind you of Jesus, in John 21, using the very same words to put Peter on the spot: “Do you love me?” View Resource

  • Confession unto Death Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Some people call us theological diehards “conservatives.” That term is appropriate, since we do want to conserve something. But a better word, one that we increasingly use, is “confessionals.” This term throws the emphasis on what we want to conserve, namely, our specific confessions of faith. Calvinists have the Three Forms of Unity. We Lutherans have The Book of Concord, a word that means unity, but it consists of no less than eleven documents. So many might seem a little much. But each confession has an important place in our theology. The Book of Concord consists of the … View Resource

  • Theology in Perspective Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2004

    While a student in Bible college I was faced with a dilemma. According to a professor of mine, as a minister, I could either be a student of theology or a student of Scripture. It was his contention that ministers are called to be students of Scripture, not students of theology. I wrestled between the two options for many months. Would I be a faithful student of Scripture or would I be an articulate student of theology? I was convinced that in order to pursue theological study I would need to sacrifice my devotion to the study of Scripture, and … View Resource

  • With Heart and Mind Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2002

    Reformed folk have not earned a reputation for hearts overflowing with love. We tend to be the cerebral ones, very careful to dot our theological I’s and cross our philosophical T’s. Given our peculiar gift, it is no small wonder that we react to the charge of having cold hearts with carefully reasoned arguments. Sometimes we stack syllogism upon syllogism to prove our warmth; other times we stack syllogism upon syllogism to prove that warm hearts are a bad thing to begin with. But all too often, the charges against us are true. Instead of constructing another argument, the proper … View Resource