• Feeding Your Soul Article by Jon Bloom

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    When your soul is in turmoil, it’s hard to see clearly. Fear, anger, sorrow, and despair can distort your perception of reality. It’s hard to keep things in perspective. They can actually magnify your troubles. Often, when you’re feeling overwhelmed, what you need is somebody to take you by the shoulders, look you square in the eye, and speak some sense to you. Sometimes that somebody is you. I get this from the Bible. Listen to the psalmist talk to himself: “Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me … View Resource

  • How to Stay Christian in Seminary Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    The point is this.” I love it when Paul says that in 2 Corinthians 9:6. He makes sure he has our attention and tells it straight. Behind the reasoned prose and the rhetorical flourishes, here’s what he’s getting at—plain, simple, straightforward. “The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.” Beautifully direct. The same humble approach helps when we take up the topic of “staying Christian” in seminary. There is so much (good) advice to be given. There are many experiences to be relayed, warnings to be … View Resource

  • Every Conflict Is a Test Article by Alexander Strauch

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    The New Testament does not hide the fact that nearly every church in the Apostolic age experienced conflict. As the New Testament writers addressed these matters, they provided invaluable instruction on how believers are to think, act, and treat one another when conflict arises. By studying the churches in the New Testament and the instructions given to them regarding conflict, we can learn biblical principles for handling conflict in a constructive, Christ-honoring way. A Key Principle to Remember One of the most important principles I have discovered to guide me when engaged in conflict of any kind is found in … View Resource

  • Soft Hearts, Solid Spines Article by Joe Holland

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2012

    The Internet allows unprecedented opportunity for communication between Christians from different theological traditions. The results have not been pretty. Comment threads are the Devil’s playground and blogs his amusement park. And even if we exclude online media, theological bickering between Christians is and has been pervasive. Regrettably, Christians who hold to the Reformed confessions are often viewed by other Christians outside our tradition as some of the least winsome members of what we call the communion of the saints. The command to love has been lost by us, if not lost on us. But how can the theologically astute love … View Resource

  • In Defense of Words Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    What is a pastor? I was asked this question not too long ago by a teenage girl who apparently didn’t know the meaning of the word pastor and was curious to learn. I must admit that I was somewhat shocked and quite saddened that she didn’t know what a pastor is, but I quickly sought to offer her an explanation of the word and how I serve as a pastor of God’s people by preaching, teaching, praying, evangelizing, discipling, counseling, and so on. And just as these words were coming out of my mouth, I realized that if she didn’t … View Resource

  • Problematic Analogies and Prayerful Adoration Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Ask any children’s Sunday school teacher what the most difficult thing to teach is and he will almost certainly tell you: “The doctrine of the Trinity, that God is one but exists in three persons.” Ask them how they do it and you will probably find them outlining an analogy: “God is like water, ice, and steam” is one of the more popular. The problem with such an analogy — indeed, with any analogy — for the Trinity is that it is actually more misleading than helpful. What it describes is not really something akin to the biblical Trinity … View Resource

  • The Gospel and Solitude Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2011

    When my grandparents married in 1919 and began farming, solitude was a way of life. my grandfather spent most of his days alone in the fields, and my grandmother spent her time alone (until the children came along) in the farmhouse. There were no planes flying overhead and no cars or tractors rambling nearby. No radio, television, or telephone was heard, nor even the slightest electrical hum. The only sounds my grandparents heard all day were the sounds of God’s creation — the wind, the birds, the animals — or the ones they themselves made while doing their work. It … View Resource

  • The Deep Things of Christ Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011 | Hebrews 6

    Therefore let us leave the elementary doctrine of Christ and go on to maturity” (Heb. 6:1). I recently spoke with a good friend and fellow minister (who is laboring in a spiritually barren part of the country) about how things were going in ministry. In the course of our conversa-tion, he mentioned that he had been meeting with the pastor of another church in town in order to talk about theology, pastoral ministry, and preaching. My friend had mentioned his commitment to continually preach Christ so that God’s people would be established and grow in their union with Him … View Resource

  • Seeing the Gospel in the Word of God Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Surely no one reading this article needs to be convinced of the importance of feeding upon the Word of God. As Jesus said, “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matt. 4:4). It is through the regular, personal intake of the Bible that we come to know God better, understand His will for our lives, experience God’s transforming presence, and much more. But have you considered the significance of daily saturation in Scripture for developing a more gospel-centered, Christ-focused life? Here’s what I mean: in your Bible reading … View Resource

  • Truly Spiritual Disciplines Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    As you’ve surely noticed, everyone is “spiritual” today. I saw a USA Today survey that found even a majority of atheists consider themselves “spiritual” people. Come to think of it, I’ve never heard anyone say, “You know, I’m just not a spiritual person.” Perhaps for many, spirituality simply means spending time occasionally in personal reflection. For others, maybe it means consciously trying to live by certain principles or attempting to be thoughtful on important issues such as the environment or homelessness. However, the common perception of spirituality is not the biblical one. I’m writing from the perspective that spirituality … View Resource

  • The Sinkhole Syndrome Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2010

    You know the story. A man has been a believer in Christ for decades. To all outward appearances he’s a man of Christian faithfulness and integrity. He has maintained a reputation as a fine example of public and private faithfulness to the things of God for decades. Then, without warning, it all collapses into a sinkhole of sin. Everyone wonders how it could have happened so quickly. In most cases, it soon becomes known that—like most sinkholes—the problem didn’t develop overnight. View Resource

  • Dealing with Differences Article by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2009

    We are called upon by the Lord to contend earnestly for the faith (Jude 3). But that does not necessarily involve being contentious; it involves avoiding compromise, standing forth for what we believe, standing forth for the truth of God — without welching at any particular moment. Thus, we are bound to meet, at various points and various levels, people with whom we disagree. We disagree in some areas of Christian doctrine. We disagree as to some details of church administration. We disagree as to the way in which certain tasks of the church should be pursued. And, in fact … View Resource

  • With Malice Aforethought Article by Kris Lundgaard

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007

    When Genevieve told Liz she was wearing her blouse inside-out, Liz was mortified. The verb mortify comes from a Latin word for death, so it fits Liz: she wanted to die. Nowadays we rarely use the word in any other sense than this common shame felt by teenagers. But, once upon a time, believers used “mortify” and its noun mortification to name our duty to put sin to death (Rom. 8:13; Col. 3:5). And if we sweep away the cobwebs, mortification turns out to be a refreshing perspective on the Christian life — a helpful angle on what … View Resource

  • Our Identity in Christ Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    Remembering all the personal identification numbers, passwords, login names, ID cards, and the like that are a part of my everyday routine gets tiring. In order to conduct any business on the Internet, enter my residence, pay bills, access email, or enter my gym, I either enter a plethora of keystrokes or flash one of my various ID cards. Despite these little inconveniences, it is a relief to know that there are still a few places such as the homes of friends and family and the church where “secret handshakes,” ID cards, and special personal identification numbers are not … View Resource

  • A Priestly Nation Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    Several months ago my grandmother passed away, somewhat unexpectedly. For many days and weeks after she died, I had a deep sense of sadness as I mourned her death. I was close to her, having spent a great deal of time with her since moving to Orlando about seven years ago. When she died, I was able to be by her side in the hospital along with most of our family. I will always count that as a great blessing. Still, it is hard to believe that I will not be able to see her again this side of heaven … View Resource