• Bearing with the Weak Devotional

    Romans 15:1-3

    As servants of Jesus, we are not greater than our Master. In serving others, bearing God’s wrath to atone for our sin, He endured unimaginable suffering. We will “suffer” as well when we have to refrain from exercising the full extent of our freedom in Christ as we serve others. At such times we should look away from ourselves to our Savior, asking for Him to sustain us when we must bear with the scruples of others, praying that by our doing so they will grow to Christian maturity. View Resource

  • Mercy On All Devotional

    Romans 11:30-32

    John Calvin comments that “there is no reason why they who have a hope of salvation should despair of others; for whatever [Christians] may now be, they have been like all the rest. If [believers] have emerged from unbelief through God’s mercy alone, they ought to leave place for it as to others also.” The Lord shows mercy to all kinds of people, so we must never think that someone is beyond the reach of God’s grace. Let us not be surprised when He saves sinners. View Resource

  • Wild Olive Branches Devotional

    Romans 11:16-18

    As fallen human beings, we are constantly tempted to believe that the reason we are Christians is that we are somehow better than others. Even within the church, we are tempted to believe that we have a monopoly on God’s grace and that others who are not part of our denomination are second-class citizens in the kingdom of heaven. This is a tremendous error, and one against which we should be vigilant at all times. If we find it in ourselves, let us repent. View Resource

  • The Covenant of Grace Devotional

    Genesis 3

    Scripture often depicts the Lord as One who is slow to anger and patient with sinners (Ex. 34:6). The fact that He did not destroy Adam and Eve right away after they sinned in Eden is perhaps the best example of this. We are not to presume upon God’s kindness, but neither should we think that the Lord is just looking for us to slip up so that He can strike us down. He is eager for us to repent, and that is what we must do when His Holy Spirit convicts us of our sin. View Resource

  • None Can Condemn Devotional

    Romans 8:33-34

    As if our justification were not enough, Paul also points to the objective reality of Christ’s intercession for us. In conjunction with the Holy Spirit, Jesus intercedes with us, and He has a “preoccupation with the security of his people” (Murray). He asks His Father to give us all that we need to persevere in our faith, and the perfect love between the three persons of the Trinity means this prayer is always according to God’s will and always accomplishes that for which our Lord prays. View Resource

  • Sparing Not His Son Devotional

    Romans 8:31-32

    God’s willingness to give up His own Son to death demonstrates unambiguously that He is for us. He is on our side, or better yet, we are on His side, and there is nothing that anyone or anything can do that will finally harm us. What looks like our loss and the victory of our enemies over us is only temporary, for the final victory is assuredly ours in Christ. John Calvin comments, “Having [God] as our defender, we need fear no harm.” View Resource

  • Missing the Mark Devotional

    James 4:17

    Human beings have a universal sense of oughtness. We know that we ought to meet certain standards. We know that we ought to be better than we are, and so we are always trying to improve ourselves morally, physically, spiritually, and so forth. This oughtness testifies to the universal knowledge that there is a transcendent standard that we fail to meet. As we share the gospel, we should point to this sense in order to help people understand their guilt before God. View Resource

  • The Law of the Mind vs. the Law of Sin Devotional

    Romans 7:22-23

    Though we have changed hearts if we truly believe in Christ, that does not mean we are not thoroughly affected by sin. Our minds, emotions, bodies, and everything else are tainted by our flesh—the fallenness that God does not eliminate fully until He glorifies us. The battle between the new self and what remains of the old is real and fierce, and we should have no illusions of final victory before our deaths. But we should not be discouraged. In Christ, we will finally defeat the flesh. View Resource

  • Evil Lurking Close at Hand Devotional

    Romans 7:21

    In his commentary Romans, Dr. R.C. Sproul writes, “[Paul] identifies himself not with the one who wills to do evil but with the one who wants to do right.” The desire to love and please God, granted to us by the Holy Spirit, signifies who we really are in Jesus. When the Christian sins, he is in a real sense acting out of character, for God has changed him. When we face temptation, let us remind ourselves that we have put on Christ and cannot “wear” Adam any longer. View Resource

  • Sinful Beyond Measure Devotional

    Romans 7:13

    Augustine of Hippo writes, “The law is given not to take away sin nor to deliver us from it but to reveal what sin is before grace comes. The result is that those who are placed under the law are seized by an even stronger desire to sin and sin even more.” Sin’s twisting of the law means we cannot obey it truly if we put any stock in our ability to do so. But if we confess our sin and rest in Christ alone for salvation, He empowers us to keep it truly, but imperfectly, in gratitude for His … View Resource

  • Sin’s Perversion of the Law Devotional

    Romans 7:8-11

    In Romans 7:11, Paul says that sin uses the law to deceive fallen people. There are many ways that this can happen, but one of them is that sin often takes things that the law says are good in themselves and deceives us into making them ultimate goods, that is, idols. If we rest all our hope in achieving something that the law says is good—obedient children, a good name, and so forth—we might be making that good thing into an idol. View Resource

  • Knowing Sin Devotional

    Romans 7:7

    When we see that Paul refers to the law of God as good and holy (Rom. 7:7–12), we can better understand how the psalmist can declare his love for the law (Ps. 119:97). The holiness and goodness of the law elicit praise in the hearts of converted people. Although in Christ we no longer stand under the law in the same way that we did before conversion, it remains to guide us, and we learn to love it in a way that was impossible before we were saved. View Resource

  • The Wages of Sin vs. the Gift of Life Devotional

    Romans 6:22-23

    John Calvin comments, “Our salvation is altogether through the grace and mere beneficence of God… . It is through God’s gift we obtain it, and not through our own merits.” Eternal life is not the wage paid to those who sanctify themselves by God’s Spirit. Though it is the final end of our sanctification, it is not something we merit in any way. If it were, we would never get there, for no work of ours is ever good enough to earn life everlasting. View Resource

  • United to Christ Devotional

    Romans 6:5–7

    We served the master of sin for a long time, so we are tempted to live the life of the old man, the life of the one whom sin controls. But sin is no longer our master. When we died, sin lost its authority to control us, and we lost the obligation to do whatever it says. We sin when we forget that sin is no longer our rightful master, that we died to any “legitimate” authority it had over us. We are bound to a new Master, and our obligation to Him is holiness. View Resource

  • United to Christ Devotional

    Romans 6:5–7

    We served the master of sin for a long time, so we are tempted to live the life of the old man, the life of the one whom sin controls. But sin is no longer our master. When we died, sin lost its authority to control us, and we lost the obligation to do whatever it says. We sin when we forget that sin is no longer our rightful master, that we died to any “legitimate” authority it had over us. We are bound to a new Master, and our obligation to Him is holiness. View Resource