• The Battle of Our Lives Article by Stanley Gale

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    After dinner, the Bible study group sat down to discuss what topic they would take up next. Someone suggested they study spiritual warfare. “Why would we study that?” asked another member, “What does that have to do with us?” The group leader answered her question with questions: “What do you think is going on when you wrestle with sin? How about when you have doubts about the Bible’s teaching?”  Spiritual warfare is not about demon possession or some obscure topic tangential to the Christian life. It involves our walk with Christ and our work for His kingdom, both of which … View Resource

  • Caregiving: A Cause for Christ Article by Ken Tada

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    Lots of people agree: I have a beautiful wife. With her ready smile and engaging personality, most people hardly notice her wheelchair. And when they learn that she writes books, travels extensively, and leads a dynamic ministry to people with disabilities around the globe, they’re amazed. To most of the world, Joni Eareckson Tada doesn’t seem disabled at all. After almost forty-five years of quadriplegia, Joni makes having hands and feet that don’t work look easy. I love that about my wife. I like that she doesn’t make a big deal about her spinal cord injury but simply moves forward … View Resource

  • Christian Exiles Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    In a profound sense, this world is not our home. When we are away from our bodies we will be “at home with the Lord” (2 Cor. 5:8). We are not to be “conformed to this age” (Rom. 12:2). Our lives “are hid with Christ in God” (Col. 3:3). We have been “transferred out of the dominion of darkness into the kingdom of his beloved Son” (Col. 1:13). We have “passed out of death and into life” (1 John 3:14). We are exiles and strangers here. The fact that we are exiles on the earth (1 Peter 2:11) does not … View Resource

  • A Community for Broken Homes Article by James Coffield

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    It’s 10:30 a.m. on Sunday morning and a monumental battle is being waged. Margi wants to go to church, but is it really worth the trouble? Her disabled son is more difficult to deal with in the mornings. She doesn’t go to the earlier adult Sunday school class, for there is nowhere for her child to go. It could be that she reads too much into the glance from the lady with the perfect hair and family. Some people seem to communicate pity, some seem to be annoyed, and some are kind. She feels shame and wonders if anyone would … View Resource

  • The Discipline of Serving Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    Thus far this year in Tabletalk, I have focused on the gospel and the personal spiritual disciplines of the Christian life. the discipline of serving comes next, and I know Most other disciplines sound much more interesting. Meditation on Scripture appeals to our desire for spiritual depth. Fasting can strike us as a challenge to a rugged, self-denying discipleship. But serving? It sounds so mundane, even demeaning. Enter Jesus and the gospel. Jesus declared, “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28). God works … View Resource

  • Don’t Retire; We Need You Article by Alex Chediak

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2009

    You may have heard that retirement can kill you. Men and women die of boredom, for lack of intellectual challenge, or from the deafening silence that can accompany a spouse’s death. Depressed saving accounts may represent another motivation to stay gainfully employed. Even if times were better, you might simply prefer staying active in your career, maintaining a position of influence that you’ve worked hard to reach. It is lawful to seek fruitfulness with one’s skills and talents. Yet there are better reasons than financial stability and longevity for remaining engaged with the world. There is the unique opportunity to … View Resource

  • The Egocentric Predicament Article by Kelly Kapic

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2012

    Who is the center of your life? Is your answer Jesus, or is it your children, your friends, or your spouse? What if I told you that the answer to that question is you? And what if I said that is OK ? Let us be clear: the question is not if you are the center of your universe — you are. This is what philosophers and psychologists sometimes call the egocentric predicament. Put simply, we cannot escape ourselves. Whatever we feel, think, speak, or believe, it is we who are doing the feeling, thinking, speaking,or believing. When we engage … View Resource

  • Good News and Good Deeds Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    The writer of the letter to the Hebrews exhorts us to “consider how to stir up one another to love and good works” (Heb. 10:24). In other words, we are to carefully ponder or study how we might encourage or stimulate each other to love God and our neighbor, in fulfillment of the two great commands that Jesus gives in Matthew 22:37–40. Authentic love for God and neighbor is not a mere warming of our affections, however, but as the writer of Hebrews assumes, always manifests itself in good deeds. Of course, this command to encourage others applies in all … View Resource

  • Holy Orders Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    In 2 Timothy 2:15 Paul admonishes Timothy with these words: “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.” This is a sacred charge to ministers and to all professors of the Christian religion: that we are known by and well versed in truth. The substance of that truth is to be seen in our conduct, and the benefits of that truth extend to our neighbor. But the Christian church in America is increasingly unacquainted with truth, ashamed of our ancient faith, unapproved … View Resource

  • The Imitation of Christ Article by Scott Seaton

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    My ministry is to teach refugee families to read.” “I lead children’s Sunday school.” “I’m on the missions committee.” “I serve at the clothes closet once a week.” “I really don’t know what my ministry is.” These responses are typical of the answers you may hear when you ask God’s people about how they’re involved in ministry. Then dig a little deeper to find out what prompted them to serve: “I read a verse about caring for people in need.” “I like to teach.” “My spiritual gift is mercy, so I got involved in a mercy ministry.” “I don’t feel … View Resource

  • Love by Submission Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    Ephesians 5:21 poses a conundrum: Paul commends Spirit-filled Christians for “submitting to one another.” Isolate the verse from its context, and it almost sounds as if the Apostle teaches a kind of mutual, universal submission, without regard to any structured leadership, hierarchy, or chain of command—as if he means to declare all authority void. But in the very next verse, Paul expressly commands wives to be subject to their husbands (v. 22). Half a chapter later, he commands children to obey their parents (6:1) and slaves to obey their masters (6:5). Those injunctions aren’t followed by calls for reciprocal submission. … View Resource

  • Mercy Established Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    From Hebrews 7:26–28 we see the importance given to the fact that Jesus identifies with those for whom He died by undergoing temptation. We are also made aware of the necessity that this High Priest be sinless, or else He would not have been qualified to enter into the heavenly sanctuary on our behalf. The author of this epistle clearly assumes that this once-for-all sacrifice is enacted on behalf of individuals: “… since he did this [offer a sacrifice for the sins of the people] once for all when he offered up himself” (Heb. 7:27b). What wondrous love is this? … View Resource

  • Nursemaid to the World: The Church Amid Adversity and Sickness Article by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    Charles Haddon Spurgeon, the great Victorian pastor, not only was a masterful pulpiteer, a brilliant administrator, a gifted writer, and a selfless evangelist, he was a determined champion of the deprived and the rejected. He spent more than half of his incredibly busy schedule on one or another of the sixty organizations or institutions he founded for their care and comfort. Once, a skeptic accosted Spurgeon on the street outside a market in London, scornfully challenging both the practicality and the genuineness of the preacher’s faith. Spurgeon gracefully answered the man by pointing out the failure of contemporary “free thinkers” … View Resource

  • Rejoice with Trembling Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011 | Psalms 2

    Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and you perish in the way, for his wrath is quickly kindled. Blessed are all who take refuge in him.” (Ps. 2:11–12) Serve the Lord with fear… This command does not cancel out Psalm 100:2: “Serve the Lord with gladness.” Serving the Lord with fear and serving the Lord with gladness do not contradict each other. The next phrase from this selection will make that plain (“rejoice with trembling”). There is real fear and real joy. The reason there is real fear is that … View Resource

  • The Service of Leading Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    Good music is hard to find these days. In fact, I would argue, most of what we hear today isn’t music at all, it’s just synthesized noise with a beat. Good music, however, takes time to produce. It takes talented musicians who are able not only to play their instruments well but are able to play in harmony with other instrumentalists. Several years ago I had the opportunity to hear the complete oratorio of George Frederick Handel’s Messiah. The chorus and orchestra were impeccable, and after the final “amen,” the thousands who packed the large hall rose to their feet … View Resource