• The Imitation of Christ Article by Scott Seaton

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    My ministry is to teach refugee families to read.” “I lead children’s Sunday school.” “I’m on the missions committee.” “I serve at the clothes closet once a week.” “I really don’t know what my ministry is.” These responses are typical of the answers you may hear when you ask God’s people about how they’re involved in ministry. Then dig a little deeper to find out what prompted them to serve: “I read a verse about caring for people in need.” “I like to teach.” “My spiritual gift is mercy, so I got involved in a mercy ministry.” “I don’t feel … View Resource

  • The Service of Leading Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    Good music is hard to find these days. In fact, I would argue, most of what we hear today isn’t music at all, it’s just synthesized noise with a beat. Good music, however, takes time to produce. It takes talented musicians who are able not only to play their instruments well but are able to play in harmony with other instrumentalists. Several years ago I had the opportunity to hear the complete oratorio of George Frederick Handel’s Messiah. The chorus and orchestra were impeccable, and after the final “amen,” the thousands who packed the large hall rose to their feet … View Resource

  • Mercy Established Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    From Hebrews 7:26–28 we see the importance given to the fact that Jesus identifies with those for whom He died by undergoing temptation. We are also made aware of the necessity that this High Priest be sinless, or else He would not have been qualified to enter into the heavenly sanctuary on our behalf. The author of this epistle clearly assumes that this once-for-all sacrifice is enacted on behalf of individuals: “… since he did this [offer a sacrifice for the sins of the people] once for all when he offered up himself” (Heb. 7:27b). What wondrous love is this? … View Resource

  • What the Needy Need Article by Richard Phillips

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Since we live in a fallen world, our greatest strengths have a way of giving birth to our greatest weaknesses. This is why some churches that emphasize a strong Bible-preaching pulpit are less vigorous in ministries of mercy. One inner city Presbyterian church participated in a study regarding mercy ministries. The study commended the church for its vigorous efforts to minister to the needy and the lost. But the study report expressed this approval in telling language: it said that the church “is deeply committed to teaching and preaching biblical doctrine; however, it also has a heart for mercy ministry.”  … View Resource