• Seeing the Gospel in the Word of God Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Surely no one reading this article needs to be convinced of the importance of feeding upon the Word of God. As Jesus said, “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matt. 4:4). It is through the regular, personal intake of the Bible that we come to know God better, understand His will for our lives, experience God’s transforming presence, and much more. But have you considered the significance of daily saturation in Scripture for developing a more gospel-centered, Christ-focused life? Here’s what I mean: in your Bible reading, ask … View Resource

  • Standing On The Promises Of God’s Word Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2007

    It doesn’t take long to feel overwhelmed in most Christian bookstores these days. So many books, some good, some bad, all competing for your attention and dollar. You may buy a book every so often, only to have it sit next to your other books collecting dust, one of which might be your Bible. It is so easy to bypass the Word of God in our day. Television, phones, and the Internet fill up the “free-time” we have and give us the sense of being “plugged-in” and up-to-speed with our families and current world events. All of this is not … View Resource

  • United in the (whole) Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011 | 1 Corinthians 1

    We are prone to partiality. It is our habit not only to have preferences but to establish ourselves and pride ourselves in the preferences we choose. We play favorites and then rally around our favorites as we strive to demonstrate why our favorites should be everyone’s favorites. Being partial, having preferences, and playing favorites isn’t inherently wrong, so long as our partiality, preferences, and favorites are in accord with sacred Scripture. Problems quickly emerge, however, when we begin to play favorites with Scripture itself. View Resource

  • We Believe the Bible and You Do Not Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    Not too long ago, in an effort to get a better grasp of the Lutheran doctrine of the Lord’s Supper, I was reading the chapters on the sacraments in Francis Pieper’s Christian Dogmatics, and I ran across this statement: “The difference between the Lutheran Church and the Reformed in the doctrine of Baptism is fully and adequately defined by saying that the former believes God’s Word regarding Baptism, the latter not” (vol. 3, p. 269). View Resource