• Wily Jacob Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2007

    Sell me your birthright now,” Jacob demanded of his twin brother, Esau (Gen. 25:31). Thus begins the sorry tale of Abraham’s grandson. From the start, Jacob challenges us to dislike him: a self-willed, pampered child with ruthless skills in getting his own way.  Though the youngest of the twins, the birthright (rights to inherit) should have been Esau’s - a far more attractive personality all round. But God has other ideas, promising to his mother, Rebekah, that the birthright would be given to Jacob (Gen. 25:23). This was a recipe for trouble, designed to show that inheritance in God’s kingdom … View Resource

  • Cosmic Treason Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007

    The question, “What is sin?” is raised in the Westminster Shorter Catechism. The answer provided to this catechetical question is simply this: “Sin is any want of conformity to or transgression of the law of God.” Let us examine some of the elements of this catechetical response. In the first instance, sin is identified as some kind of want or lack. In the middle ages, Christian theologians tried to define evil or sin in terms of privation (privatio) or negation (negatio). In these terms, evil or sin was defined by its lack of conformity to goodness. … View Resource

  • Radically Contagious Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    When they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were uneducated, common men, they were astonished. And they recognized that they had been with Jesus” (Acts 4:13). I have always been leery of vaccinations. The idea that bits of a serious disease are put into my body is disconcerting. The doctor may use medical terms like pathogen or antigen. He may say that it is only being scratched on the surface of the skin. The fact still remains that I am purposely being exposed by direct contact to bacteria or a virus from a dangerous … View Resource

  • Eternal Persuasion Article by John Cobb

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2006

    Marketing is a difficult term to define. Books have been written, gurus have weighed in, and countless others have offered various opinions. Boiled down, however, one simple definition of marketing is “the attempt to influence the behaviors of others.” In order for an individual to purchase food, products, or services, volunteer, or donate to a particular cause, they must be influenced to behave a certain way. But this definition creates problems. The practice of influencing people has led to us being bombarded with more than one thousand unique messages per day. Most of these messages tell us what to do, … View Resource

  • The Constancy of a Pilgrim’s Life Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006

    It has been said that one hallmark of the Puritan view of the Christian life was the emphasis placed on being “constant” (or being steady and unchanging). Remember how John Bunyan puts the challenge to us to learn from the life of the pilgrim? Who would true valour see, let him come hither; one here will constant be, come wind, come weather. There’s no discouragement shall make him once relent his first avowed intent to be a pilgrim. That is, “if you want to know how to live a constant Christian life, come take a look at this guy.” The … View Resource

  • Progress Redefined Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006

    The world measures success in terms of that which is tangible — by what is bigger, faster, and by what draws the most attention. For many people, success is defined solely by numbers and circumstantial outcomes. True success, however, cannot be measured merely by what is perceived by the eyes of men. We measure our success according to economic and sociological standards, which at times is certainly appropriate considering that we are to be good stewards of our time, talents, and finances; however, the problem lies in that we measure our Christian lives according to the same principles — evaluating … View Resource

  • Following Christ Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    Have you ever been tempted to surrender control of your life to any of Christ’s enemies? May 30 is Memorial Day in the United States. This month we remember those who’ve fought to establish and defend the freedoms we enjoy. And from the surrender of Fort Ticonderoga to the surrender of Germany 170 years later, surrender has always meant to submit to a new master. When you became a Christian, you did that. Peter was reminding these Christians here that that is what they had done when they became Christians. So he says in 3:15 that they were to sanctify, … View Resource

  • No Pain, No Gain Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2005

    Sometimes Scripture is just not obviously true. It is certainly true. Scripture is always true. Sometimes, however, Scripture is just not obviously true to us. At the beginning of James’ letter, we are told that we should “Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials” (James 1:2 NASB). Now, if we’re honest with ourselves, we know that this is not obvious to us. As Christians, so much of the Bible is so clearly true. We know that God made the heavens and the earth, and that the heavens tell of the glory of God. When my family … View Resource

  • Nurturing the Soul Article by Frank Farrell

    FROM TABLETALK | June 1992

    We taste Thee, O Thou living Bread, And long to feast upon Thee still; We drink of Thee, the Fountainhead, And thirst our souls from Thee to fill. It is my conviction that a very large part of mankind’s ills and of the world’s misery is due to the rampant practice of trying to feed the soul with the body’s food. Jesus in His confrontation with Satan reminded us for all time of Moses’ proper distinction: “Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matthew 4:4). Job had also made … View Resource