• The First and Second Resurrection Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    In a second perspective on the “thousand years” following the binding of Satan, John saw thrones and the judges who occupied them, the souls of those who had been beheaded for staying true to Jesus (Rev. 20:4–6). These souls “came to life” and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. Their coming to life is “the first resurrection,” and it shows that “the second death”—the eternal torment that awaits God’s enemies (19:20; 20:10, 14–15)—has no power over them. Some premillennialists construe “the first resurrection” as believers’ bodily resurrection at Christ’s second coming (see … View Resource

  • The Frozen Chosen Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    Reformed Christians are often accused of being cold and callous, virtual Stoics or fatalists. We’ve all heard the epithet “the frozen chosen” applied to Reformed believers. We usually protest that such a nickname does not truly describe us, and of course, we all know many brothers and sisters to whom such a name would never stick. But the fact that this nickname, this description of us, is so common should give us pause. Do we sometimes speak and act in ways that give rise to such an idea? Sadly, I believe we do. View Resource

  • Kingdom Life Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    Jesus promised that the kingdom of God would come in power before some of His hearers faced death (Mark 9:1). After His resurrection, He again spoke to His disciples about the kingdom of God (Acts 1:3). On the day of Pentecost, Peter announced that Jesus had been seated at God’s right hand in heaven, fulfilling God’s ancient promise to put David’s descendant on his royal throne (Acts 2:30–35). These texts, as well as many others, express the New Testament’s unanimous witness that God’s long-awaited redemptive reign, invading this sin-stained world to recapture it for its rightful king … View Resource

  • He is Not Here, He is Risen Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Many Christians seem content to leave Jesus on the cross, while the resurrection often suffers from neglect. That the cross receives so much attention, however, is not without warrant. After all, the event was the “one act of righteousness” that led “to justification and life for all men” (Rom. 5:18). That is to say, the one Man’s act of righteousness is the climactic act of Jesus’ life-long fidelity to His Father’s will and purpose, when He offered up His life for His people. Taking it one-step further, many of us are inclined to say that we will live under … View Resource

  • The New Day Article by David King

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    And He who was seated on the throne said, “Behold, I am making all things new.” Also He said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.” (Rev. 21:5). Surely, if this language of the risen, glorified Lord Jesus presupposes anything, in the light of John’s vision in verses 1–4, he intimates the complete renovation of all creation as the preparatory act by which God will consummate His eternal purposes for His people and bring them to their final fruition. This imagery: the new creation, the new Jerusalem, God’s communion with His Bride adorned in … View Resource

  • Acquainted with Death Article by Peter Leithart

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    Many today boast of near-death experiences. I do not. I have never had a near-death experience. But I am not intimidated by those who have, because I can boast, too. I have never been near death, but I have died many times. Before I was born, I was living in a warm and cozy, if somewhat damp, environment, minding my business and sucking my thumb. Birth was a death for me, a death to the womb, a death to protection and security, a death to a life of blissful and careless dependency. I cried when I was born, not because … View Resource

  • Christ is Risen: So What? Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    We live amid a culture that revels in its efficiency. Thus, to a large degree, evangelicalism has grown apathetic to its own message, the message of the Resurrection. This predicament is often demonstrated in Gospel presentations that more or less leave Jesus on the cross. This cannot be the predicament for those who proclaim Jesus as the risen and reigning Christ of the world. Michael Green’s book Christ is Risen: So What? addresses the predominant evangelical attitude of indifference toward the fundamental doctrine of the Resurrection. The title question is quite brash. Still, it is a question we ought … View Resource

  • The National Denier: Fiction Stranger than the Truth! Article by S.M. Baugh

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    It is strange, is it not, that perfectly rational, even brilliant people should believe the most untenable of fables but disbelieve the most believable of historical events? No, it is beyond strange: it is downright tragic, because to deny this one historical fact—the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ—means to die in pitiful despair (1 Cor. 15:17–19). Yet people through the ages have replaced the simple truth of Christ’s resurrection with fabulous theories of their own. They must do something, because Christ’s resurrection cannot be ignored by anyone calling himself a Christian. An enraged bull in a pasture is … View Resource

  • Raised Incorruptible Article by Jim Martin

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    In November 1990, workers cutting a new road in Jerusalem’s southern suburbs unintentionally intruded into a first-century family burial chamber. One of the ornately carved ossuaries contained the skeletal remains of six individuals: two infants, a young child under age 5, a boy in his early teens, an adult woman, and a 60- year-old male. The name “Yehoseph bar Qafa,” which was inscribed on that ossuary, suggested the burial chamber belonged to none other than the High Priest Caiaphas, who brought Jesus before Pilate. Caiaphas claimed both his priestly authority as the high priest and his judicial authority as … View Resource

  • We Shall Be Changed Article by Michael Beates

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    I am a forty-something adult. I have arrived at that place in life where I am losing weight in my legs while my midsection seems to gain every bit of that lost weight and more. I upgraded (or downgraded) to bifocal glasses a year or two ago. I seem to be just as sore when I get up in the morning as when I went to bed the night before. That adolescent sense of immortality is fading. And I know the worst is yet to come, for as I watch my body slump into middle-agedness, I see my parents and … View Resource