• Being Black and Reformed: An Interview with Anthony Carter Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Tabletalk: Why did you write the book On Being Black and Reformed? Anthony Carter: When I first came into the knowledge of Reformed theology, I was excited and invigorated to share this truth with others. However, I quickly discovered that not everyone found Reformed theology as compelling as I did (go figure). This was particularly true within African American circles. Because of the caricatures of Reformed theology that have become popular in some Christian circles, and because of the unfortunate history of some within Reformed confessing Christianity, many African Americans find Reformed theology in general, and Reformed-minded Christians in particular … View Resource

  • Truly Reformed Theology Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    It probably won’t surprise you to learn that no one has taught me more about the Bible and its theology than R.C. Sproul. And it shouldn’t surprise you to learn that no one has taught me more about mercy ministry than R.C. Sproul. Having worked for R.C. going on twelve years, I have witnessed, firsthand, one man’s faith working itself out in love. As the testimonies of his wife and children reveal, his theology of grace sustains his concern for the hungry, the widow, and the orphan. Appropriately, his theology informs his practice, as should ours. View Resource

  • Calvinism Isn’t Enough Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” Charles Dickens wrote in his classic A Tale of Two Cities. Perhaps years from now historians will reflect on the state of Calvinism at the beginning of the twenty-first century and offer similar commentary about the historico-theological tale of two, three, or four different shades of Calvinism. Perhaps the future thoroughgoing Calvinist editors of Time magazine will come out with a top-ten list called “Ten Ways God Changed the World as He Sovereignly Worked Through the Secondary Cause of Our March 12, 2009, Top Ten List.” And perhaps, … View Resource

  • Fueling Reformation Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    I’m always puzzled when I see church billboards announcing a coming revival. They give the times and the dates when the church will be engaged in revival. But I wonder, how can anybody possibly schedule a revival? True revivals are provoked by the sovereign work of God through the stirring of His Holy Spirit in the hearts of people. They happen when the Holy Spirit comes into the valley of dry bones (Ezek. 37) and exerts His power to bring new life, a revivification of the spiritual life of the people View Resource

  • The Many Shades of Calvinism Article by Paul Helm

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    The term Calvinism was first used by Lutheran theologians to refer to what they regarded as the peculiar views of Christ’s real presence at the Lord’s Supper held by John Calvin and his followers. It is not used in this way nowadays. What does it refer to now? In some cases, it denotes the entire theological system of Calvin himself as we find it in the four books of his Institutes of the Christian Religion. In other cases, and more usually, it refers to the understanding of the doctrine of salvation as we find it in the first three books. … View Resource

  • One God, Two Testaments Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    Like me, many of you reading this article did not grow up in a church that is part of the Reformed tradition. You did not have the benefit of being catechized in the Westminster Standards or the Heidelberg Catechism. Calvinism may have been a dirty word, if not in your home, then in your church. You have come to embrace the doctrines of grace after years of personal study because you have been unable to deny the truth of divine election, which is found throughout Scripture. My journey into the Reformed tradition followed this path, but it was not only the … View Resource

  • Reforming Our Mission Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    Looking across the landscape of evangelicalism, the most common misperception and criticism of Reformed theology is that it is incompatible with a high commitment to evangelism and missions. Even the slightest theological understanding and historical perspective should prevent such confusion, but the revivalistic bent of twentieth-century evangelicalism created a disastrous impression that retains cultural potency even today. None of this would surprise Charles Haddon Spurgeon. Throughout his illustrious and culture-shaping ministry as pastor of London’s Metropolitan Tabernacle, Spurgeon faced the need to defend evangelical truth and to define evangelical Calvinism over against both misperceptions and misconstruals. Spurgeon was always most … View Resource

  • Truly Reformed Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    Reformed theology has an image problem among the ranks of evangelical Christianity. And anyone who has had the unfortunate problem of being either misunderstood or misrepresented knows that it is not an easy task to repair one’s image. Other articles in this issue have taken on some of the most common misunderstandings (allegations and assumptions held by non-Reformed Christians about Reformed theology), and misrepresentations (inconsistent and imbalanced expressions of the Reformed faith by those who claim to be Reformed) associated with the negative image of Reformed theology. It is my task to challenge those who are in the wide circle … View Resource

  • Hearts Aflame: Reformed Piety Article by Philip Ryken

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2005

    Calvinism is well known and widely respected for its theology. But can we say the same thing about its piety? It is sometimes said that Calvinists do not make very good Christians. According to one critic: “Nothing will foster pride and indifference as will an affection for Calvinism. Nothing will destroy holiness and spirituality as an attachment to Calvinism. The doctrines of Calvinism will deaden and kill anything: prayer, faith, zeal, holiness.” Perhaps it is true that some people who call themselves Calvinists are not very good Christians — the “frozen chosen,” they are sometimes called. But if … View Resource

  • Turning the World Right Side Up Article by D. James Kennedy

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    The apostles came into one of the bastions of paganism in the ancient world, and the cry went up that “these men who have turned the world upside down have come here also …” (Acts 17:6b). Now that is an amazing compliment, though it wasn’t intended to be one, that in such a brief period of time the apostles already were seen as those who had transformed the world. Now what those pagans didn’t know is that long since — since the fall of man — the world has been upside down, and what the apostles were doing was … View Resource

  • Why Not? Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    As a Reformed pastor, I am regularly confronted with questions about Reformed theology. Sometimes I am asked to explain a particular point of Reformed theology, and sometimes I am asked simply to explain what Reformed theology is. Depending upon who is asking the question, and, perhaps more importantly, in what tone the question is being asked, I will often respond first by explaining precisely what Reformed theology is not. This method of identification, traditionally called the “way of negation” (via negativa), usually employed in the identification of divine attributes, is a helpful way of approaching many subjects. Though it is … View Resource