• Spokesmen for God Article by John L. MacKay

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    The Lord did not commission His prophets to act as missionaries, going to those who had never heard God’s Word, nor were they to be innovators inaugurating a radically different religion. Their primary duty was to administer spiritual first aid to those who, though nominally acquainted with the terms of the covenant, were not complying with them, either through spiritual complacency or open defiance (Jer. 2:25; Zeph. 1:12). Prophetic ministry sought to soften hardened hearts and reclaim seared consciences by urging a return to the old paths (Jer. 6:16)—behavior which conformed to God’s requirements … View Resource

  • The Prophets and the West Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    Reading the prophets can be an unsettling experience. Here we see God’s utter, absolute fury against sin. The graphic accounts of what God is going to do to His own faithless, immoral, complacent people constitute some of the scariest words in all of literature, making our horror movies seem like My Little Pony.  And then, amidst the righteous rage, the bodies heaped up and the cities ravaged, the carnage is suddenly interrupted with sheer tender grace and spot-on predictions of what Jesus will do to make Himself the object all of this wrath. Jesus takes all of this fury … View Resource

  • At Many Times; In Many Ways Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    It is probably not an exaggeration to say that most Christians have little difficulty reading the Five Books of Moses and the Historical Books of the Old Testament. Sure, we may scratch our heads in puzzlement while reading certain sections of Leviticus, but all in all, these books do not pose too much of a problem for us. They contain a narrative, a story with a beginning and end. In these books, we are on familiar ground. The poetic books are a bit more challenging because of the way in which they are written, but we still find them somewhat … View Resource

  • The Reluctant Prophet Article by Steve Kreloff

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    Anyone who has ever attended a Sunday school class knows that Jonah was the man who was eaten alive by a fish and then vomited out three days later. But that’s about the extent of most people’s understanding of this Old Testament prophet and the book that bears his name. And that’s too bad, because Jonah is a Bible character worth knowing, and the book he wrote is not only rich in theological content, but is extremely relevant. Jonah was a Hebrew prophet who lived about 750 b.c. However, unlike other Hebrew prophets, Jonah was called to minister to … View Resource

  • The Prophets Article by Bryan Estelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    The post-exilic prophets include Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, and probably Joel. They convey the message of God for this period of time with cumulative clarity since they come at the end of a long age of prophetic indictment against the people. These prophets have great explanatory power for progressive revelation up to their time. They also open the door to a new age soon to come. For a long time, God had made His desires known to the people in a covenant relationship formula that occurs time and again: “I will be their God, and they will be my people.” Even … View Resource

  • The Prophets Article by O. Palmer Robertson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    Ezekiel and Daniel experienced exile. The words slip over the tongue with such ease. We are glad to know this “brute fact” about these two prophets. Next time we get involved in a Bible trivia quiz, we will be sure of at least one answer: Ezekiel and Daniel were prophets of the exile.  But having that kind of attitude toward the “fact” of Israel’s exile is like knowing a category-five hurricane will hit your hometown in Florida within the next few hours. How can you treat this fact in such a glib, nonchalant way? A hurricane means devastation, destruction … View Resource

  • The Prophets Article by Alec Motyer

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    We do ourselves no favors by calling the first part of our Bibles the “Old Testament.” Why, the very title suggests something bygone! Of course, we are too far down the road to discard this description, but we need constantly to recall that the Lord Jesus would not have understood it. To Him, what we call the “Old Testament” was simply “the Scriptures” (John 5:39), or “the word of God” (Mark 7:13). So how can it be “bygone”? Rather, it lives and abides forever (Isa. 40:8), and if we do not find the inspired words of … View Resource

  • Covenant Prosecutors Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    I don’t remember the exact words. They went something like this: “He was a thundering paradox of a man.” These words served as the opening lines of William Manchester’s classic biography of General Douglas MacArthur. In this work, MacArthur was shown as a multi-faceted man whose essence could not be crystallized by a single attribute. In like manner, the prophets of the Old Testament were men of multi-faceted and multi-dimensioned responsibilities and behavior. Some of the roles carried out by these prophets include the following: First, the prophets of Israel were agents of revelation. They did not say,   … View Resource

  • Telling the Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    Nearly forty years ago, in his book The Church at the End of the 20th Century, Francis A. Schaeffer penned the following: “Does the church have a future in our generation? …I believe the church is in real danger. It is in for a rough day. We are facing present pressures and a present and future manipulation which will be so overwhelming in the days to come that they will make the battles of the last forty years look like child’s play.” During the past forty years, the church has seen many rough days, and I would venture to … View Resource