• Let No Man Tear Asunder Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2013

    My favorite theologian of all time is wont to argue that the defining task of the theologian is to make distinctions. That’s what we do. We bring clarity through precision, precision through distinction. The man who may well be my favorite theologian’s favorite theologian, Francis Turretin, published his three-volume work The Institutes of Elenctic Theology as a sort of systematic theology by contrast. Each point is broken down, compared and contrasted, and examined in light of its opposite. One could argue that theologians are here following the path of their Maker. We serve a God who delights in … View Resource

  • Doubt-Killing Promises Article by Justin Taylor

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Even though Charles Spurgeon lived about two hundred years after John Bunyan, I think Spurgeon regarded Bunyan as a friend. He said the book he valued most, next to the Bible, was The Pilgrim’s Progress. “I believe I have read it through at least a hundred times. It is a volume of which I never seem to tire.” Perhaps one of the reasons Spurgeon resonated with this classic was its realistic portrayal of depression, doubt, and despair. Spurgeon and Bunyan, like their Savior, were men of sorrow, acquainted with grief (Isa. 53:3). When Bunyan went to prison for … View Resource

  • Feeding Your Soul Article by Jon Bloom

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    When your soul is in turmoil, it’s hard to see clearly. Fear, anger, sorrow, and despair can distort your perception of reality. It’s hard to keep things in perspective. They can actually magnify your troubles. Often, when you’re feeling overwhelmed, what you need is somebody to take you by the shoulders, look you square in the eye, and speak some sense to you. Sometimes that somebody is you. I get this from the Bible. Listen to the psalmist talk to himself: “Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me … View Resource

  • Covenant Article by Michael Horton

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Anyone who is employed or has a mortgage, credit card, or car is familiar with contracts — and the “blessings” and “curses” that they impose. Not all legal agreements are the same, of course. A contract differs significantly from a last will and testament, which can make you a beneficiary of someone else’s estate. You benefit not by a “work-for-hire” arrangement or a payment program but by a gift. Similarly, there are different kinds of covenants in the Bible. Reformed theology has discerned in Scripture three overarching covenants. The covenant of redemption is the agreement of the Father, Son, and … View Resource

  • The Worldwide Gospel Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008 | Matthew 24

    In His monumental discourse on the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70, and His second coming at the end of the age (Matt. 24–25), Jesus covers a vast amount of territory. While all of the discourse is important, there are certain statements that stand out in the same way that higher peaks rise above an entire mountain range. One such peak is Matthew 24:14: “And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come.” These words from Jesus stand in a long line … View Resource

  • Everlasting Promises Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    On a recent morning talk show I saw a wedding ceremony, convened on a side street in downtown New York and televised live. There were myriad peculiarities contained within this ceremony, but I was struck in particular by the vows, as administered by the presiding civil servant. He asked the would-be bride and groom if they would be true to each other’s love, accept each other unconditionally and find strength in each other’s commitment. There was no mention of God or the purpose of marriage. The vows were based exclusively on what the two would do for one another, in … View Resource

  • The Providence of God Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    The entire life of Joseph is summarized in Genesis 50:20: “As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good.” The teenager we met at the beginning of the story is now over a hundred years old. His life has come full circle, and he is addressing his duplicitous brothers. Their actions, in selling him into slavery, had nothing but evil intent written all over it. Their malevolence can in no way be lessened by the knowledge that things did not turn out as they might have done. Truth is, God overruled their evil … View Resource

  • The Edge of Death Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    All of us who are adults have had the temptation to pat a child on the head and say something appropriate. When Jacob had spent seventeen years in Egypt with his family and the time of his death drew near (Gen. 47:29), he made his son, Joseph, swear to him that he would ensure that he would not be buried in Egypt, but in his own burial plot back home in Canaan — a piece of land bought by Abraham (50:13). Then, as news of his death came to Joseph, he took his two sons, Ephraim and … View Resource

  • The Spirit of Promise Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    I don’t know if this happens to everyone, but a deep sense of longing fills my soul when I listen to Celtic music. I get homesick. I dream of the day when I can go the land of my fathers to smell the air, touch the soil, and behold the rolling green pastures and rocky hillsides. But once I get there, my longing will not relent. Once I touch the cold, mossy stones of ancient castle ruins and once-majestic cathedrals, I will realize that they are fading shadows of a time that ever slips my grasp. And this Ocean State … View Resource

  • The People, Place, and Presence of God Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    There is a sense in which the whole of the Old Testament is simply the outworking of the promise in Genesis 3:15 — that the seed of the serpent will be at enmity with the seed of the woman and that the latter will be triumphant. Now, in Genesis 12, we reach another focal point of messianic expectation — the victorious “seed” will be from the loins of a man called Abraham. Like a ringing bell, the next few chapters will announce this messianic lineage with deafening tintinnabulation (ringing of bells). Over and over, a “seed” (the ESV renders … View Resource