• The Things of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    It is one thing for a student to disagree with his teacher. But it is another thing entirely for a student to rebuke his teacher for his teaching. Yet, that is precisely what the Apostle Peter did. He had the gall to confront the incarnate Word of God, the One who embodies all truth, and rebuke Him for what He was teaching (Mark 8:32). To make matters worse, the Greek word translated as “rebuke” is used biblically in connection with the condemnation of demons. When Jesus silenced demons, He did it by rebuking them, judging them worthy of condemnation … View Resource

  • Mercy for the Impetuous Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008 | Matthew 26

    Peter didn’t just blow it, he blew it badly. “Though they all fall away…I will never fall away” (Matt. 26:33). Peter’s resolution we admire for its confidence and bravery. But it is a statement relying on one’s own strength and it is doomed for shipwreck. A few hours go by and we find him alone and weeping (v. 75).  We can relate, can’t we? We’ve made promise after promise to the Lord, resolution after resolution, only to come to the end of ourselves. The sinking feeling churns in our stomach, our earlier words of bold resolve pour like … View Resource

  • Lessons from the Fall Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008

    The Gospels depict the arrest and trial of Jesus in a way that shows us not only the insensibility of His accusers, but also His own steadfast faithfulness to the will of God through suffering and humiliation. Our Lord’s example shows us how to continue entrusting ourselves to Him who judges justly (1 Peter 2:23; 4:19). Jesus, however, was not the only one who was on trial on this momentous occasion. The gospel writers highlight the events surrounding His abuse and trumped up charges, but they also record another trial that took place that night. This second trial was … View Resource

  • The Turning Point Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008 | Matthew 16

    The turning point in Matthew’s account of Christ’s life and work occurs in chapter 16: “From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day” (v. 21 KJV).  A committee of scribes and Pharisees from Jerusalem had come to Jesus, objecting to the practice of His disciples (15:1). Now, in Magdala, another committee of Pharisees, joined by a number of Sadducees, waited to confront Him. What a strange combination … View Resource