• Avoiding Burnout Article by Archie Parrish

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2014

    Every true believer has sufficient grace to finish well. If this is true, and I believe it is, why do so many believers burn out? What Is Burnout? The term burnout was coined by rocket scientists to describe shutting down a jet or rocket engine by exhausting or shutting off its fuel. Dr. Herbert J. Freudenberg, in his 1974 book Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement, was the first psychologist to use this term. He defined burnout as “the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one’s devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired … View Resource

  • God’s Provision for the Weary Pilgrim Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2012

    The distractions of the world and the temptations of the Devil would be enough to derail almost any pilgrim on their journey to heaven. But add to these the manifold frailties of our sinful flesh, and this triumvirate of Christian foes would seem to rule out any hope of reaching the Celestial City. Devotion and zeal can fade with every bend in the road until we are lost and alone. Despair and anxiety set in. Such have been the struggles of all pilgrims. Because of the One who sets us on our pilgrimage, we leave the delusional comforts of our … View Resource

  • Keep On Article by Eric Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    While I was still a theological student, Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones came from London to Glasgow to preach at the great St. Andrews Hall. This auditorium held more than two thousand people. It was packed, and the preaching was wonderful. After the meeting finished, I was waiting at the side of the platform for transport home. A long line of people were waiting to speak to Dr. Lloyd-Jones, and because I was fairly close to them, I heard some of the conversations. Interestingly, I noticed that every encounter ended in the same way: “Keep on!” was the doctor’s final exhortation … View Resource

  • Pilgrims in a Post-Christian Culture Article by Voddie Baucham

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    In John Bunyan’s classic The Pilgrim’s Progress, the Wicket Gate is a symbol for entrance into the Christian life. There, the main character, Christian, encounters the gatekeeper, Good-Will. Their encounter, like the rest of the book, is filled with layers of meaning to which modern pilgrims would do well to pay attention: So when the pilgrim was fully inside, Good Will asked him, “Who directed you to come this way?” CHRISTIAN: Evangelist exhorted me to come this way and knock at the Gate, just as I did. He further told me that you, sir, would tell me what … View Resource

  • The Religious Affections Article by Owen Strachan

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    Many years ago, in a wild and woolly period known as the First Great Awakening, colonial pastor Jonathan Edwards took on the tricky task of sorting out what place the “religious affections,” as he called them, have in the Christian life. Here’s what he said as a foundational tenet: There are false affections, and there are true. A man’s having much affection, don’t prove that he has any true religion: but if he has no affection, it proves that he has no true religion. (Works of Jonathan Edwards 2:121) Edwards wrote these words to help people … View Resource

  • Fixing Our Eyes on Jesus Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2012

    The twentieth-century British pastor D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones said, “If we only spent more of our time in looking at Christ we should soon forget ourselves.” Fixing our eyes on Christ is the first step and the entire path of the Christian life. We don’t look to Christ in faith to be saved and then look to ourselves to persevere. We trust Christ alone as our Savior and look to Christ alone and follow Him as our Lord. In order to look to Christ as our Savior and Lord, we need new eyes and a new heart. We are born … View Resource

  • Federally Backed Security Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2009

    Nations are currently experiencing the most volatile economic period in a generation. Many investors have made moves to reduce their risk and put their treasure into securities backed by the U.S. federal government. The government gives us its word that it will guarantee deposits up to a certain amount. If that institution falters, will our financial peace of mind endure? The stakes are even higher when we consider the treasure of our souls. What guarantee do you have that you are headed toward an eternity of joy rather than an eternity of judgment? Many Christians would answer that they … View Resource

  • He Is Able Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    When I was young, I received an odd birthday gift. It was odd on two counts. First, it was a book. I did not read unless absolutely necessary. The other odd thing was the subject of the book. It was nothing more than an anthology of people’s failures. The title of the book is The Incomplete Book of Failures. I never understood the point of the book except maybe to help me find someone to laugh at. Little did I know at that time that I was worthy to be numbered among that incomplete list of failures. During my younger … View Resource

  • Long December Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    This month is a time for decisions. A year is ending, another is about to begin. We remember Christ’s decision to come to earth and take on flesh. The gatherings of families remind us of those nearest and dearest. Many people have anniversaries around Christmas. The most important of all decisions is to turn from our sins and to trust in Christ. The little letter of Jude shows us the contrast between a life lived with true faith and a life lived without it. “Faith” in the Greek is both a verb and a noun, more like our word “trust … View Resource

  • Love and Its Counterfeit Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    I mentioned some months ago in my article that 2005 was the 450th anniversary of the martyrdom of John Bradford. It also is the 450th anniversary of the martyrdoms of Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer, two bishops in the English Reformation who were clear preachers of the Gospel, and two witnesses who were faithful unto death. The older Latimer said to the younger man Ridley as he was walking out to the stake to be burned, “Play the man, Ridley!” And so he did. Both these men could have saved their lives simply by renouncing their faith in Christ’s … View Resource

  • Ready for the End? Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    It’s sixty years ago now that William Laurence wrote, “Observers in the tail of our ship saw a giant ball of fire rise as though from the bowels of the earth, belching forth enormous white smoke rings.” This is just a small part of the description of what must have been one of the most apocalyptic sights ever viewed by humans — the destruction of Nagasaki, Japan, by a single atomic bomb on August 9, 1945. Few people are still alive who actually witnessed that sight on that day. A more terrifying sight can hardly be imagined. Churchill wondered … View Resource

  • In the Hope of His Glory Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    One of the most beautiful passages of Scripture found itself eloquently translated in the seventeenth century: “There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy place of the tabernacles of the most High. God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help her, and that right early” (Ps. 46:4–5 kjv). The allusion here is simple; the charge, direct. The stream is probably Shiloah, which flowed from the Gihon spring into Jerusalem, God’s city. The stream and where it flowed encompassed two of the most important aspects … View Resource

  • Almost Home Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    Genuine perseverance and assurance are sorely lacking among Christians today. The fruits of perseverance and assurance — diligent use of the means of grace, perseverance in heartfelt obedience to God’s will, desire for fellowship with God, yearning for God’s glory and heaven, love for the church and intercession for revival — all appear to be waning. We desperately need rich, doctrinal thinking about perseverance and assurance coupled with vibrant, sanctified living. What is “perseverance of the saints” and what is “assurance of faith”? How do perseverance and assurance assist each other in the Christian life? Perseverance of the Saints We … View Resource

  • The Means of Persevering Grace Article by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    Until the Arminian controversy in the Netherlands in the early seventeenth century, Calvinism did not have five points. Calvinism summarized itself in its great confessions and catechisms and never thought to reduce itself to five points. The Arminians, however, had five attacks on Reformed teaching, which they summarized in 1610. On the fifth point they wrote, in part: “But whether they [those incorporated into Jesus Christ] can through negligence fall away from the first principle of their life in Christ, again embrace the present world, depart from the pure doctrine once given to them, lose the good conscience, and neglect … View Resource

  • More Than Conquerors Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    If you have it, you never lose it; if you lose it, you never had it.” This pithy adage gives expression to the doctrine in the church that some call the doctrine of eternal security, while others refer to it as the “perseverance of the saints.” Among the latter group, the perseverance of the saints makes up the fifth point of the so-called “Five Points of Calvinism” that are encapsulated in the acronym TULIP — the “P,” the final point, standing for “perseverance of the saints.” Another way of expressing the doctrine in pithy categories is … View Resource