• Keep the Presence of God Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    On vacation, I kept a copy of Jonathan Edwards’ sermons on my bedside table as a way of going to sleep with a God-centered mind. One of those sermons was called “Keeping the Presence of God.” It was preached on a colony-wide fast day in April 1742. The second wave of the First Great Awakening had crested in the vicinity, and Edwards was seeing both the good and bad fallout of revival. He saw spiritual dangers lurking everywhere. In the next year, as he preached his famous series on the religious affections, he would become the most careful analyst and … View Resource

  • United in the (whole) Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011 | 1 Corinthians 1

    We are prone to partiality. It is our habit not only to have preferences but to establish ourselves and pride ourselves in the preferences we choose. We play favorites and then rally around our favorites as we strive to demonstrate why our favorites should be everyone’s favorites. Being partial, having preferences, and playing favorites isn’t inherently wrong, so long as our partiality, preferences, and favorites are in accord with sacred Scripture. Problems quickly emerge, however, when we begin to play favorites with Scripture itself. View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 3 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Galatians 4

    In the two previous installment in our series on Gal 4:4-5, we have learned four features of the Apostle’s answer to the question, what Child is this who was born at Christmas? We have focused on the Child as the heart of history, on two circumstances of His birth, and on the purpose of His coming. In this final installment we learn two more features of Christmas according to Paul. View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 2 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Galatians 4

    In our first installment in this series on Christmas according to Paul, we learned that, for the Apostle, Jesus is the Child for whom all of time had waited and who was born of a woman. In the second part of our series, we learn two more truths about Christmas from Paul as he writes in Gal 4:4-5. View Resource

  • Unregrettable, Hard Words Article by Burk Parsons

    2 Corinthians 7:8–9 “For even if I made you grieve with my letter, I do not regret it—though I did regret it, for I see that that letter grieved you, though only for a while. As it is, I rejoice, not because you were grieved, but because you were grieved into repenting.” In reflecting on his previous letter to the Corinthian church, the apostle Paul is rightly mindful to draw attention to the grief that his letter caused among his recipients, not to mention the grief he himself experienced. View Resource

  • No Sacrifice Too Great Article by Michael Haykin

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    In the final letter that we have from the apostle Paul, written in a lonely prison cell in Rome while he was expecting death for the sake of the gospel, he reminded his closest friend Timothy of the utter necessity of passing on the faith to “faithful men” (2 Tim. 2:2). It bears noting that what Paul envisaged in these words was not simply doctrinal instruction in the essentials of Christianity. Of course, Paul expected the training of future leaders to involve the handing on of doctrine. But, as is clear from a later statement by Paul in this … View Resource

  • Holy Orders Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    In 2 Timothy 2:15 Paul admonishes Timothy with these words: “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.” This is a sacred charge to ministers and to all professors of the Christian religion: that we are known by and well versed in truth. The substance of that truth is to be seen in our conduct, and the benefits of that truth extend to our neighbor. But the Christian church in America is increasingly unacquainted with truth, ashamed of our ancient … View Resource

  • A New Paul? Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    Liberals have been attempting to separate Paul from Jesus at least from the time of the nineteenth-century agnostic Matthew Arnold to today’s best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code. “Paul is the true founder of Christianity,” they say, not seeing this as a good thing. According to this view, Jesus preached a simple message of love. Then Paul came along to distort Jesus’ beautiful teachings into an oppressive institutional religion. Never mind that, by their own higher critical scholarship, Paul’s writings are the earliest documents of the New Testament, that they pre-date the Gospels of the life of Christ. Never … View Resource

  • The Least of the Apostles Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    There are about twenty-six different Christian character traits taught either by precept or example in the New Testament. Three of them, trusting God (as opposed to being anxious or afraid), love, and humility, are taught more often than all the others together. Since some of the remaining ones — such as compassion, kindness, gentleness, and patience — grow out of love and humility, we can learn a lot about the character of the apostle Paul by limiting our study to these three traits. Looking first at Paul’s trust in God, we recall that he is the one who wrote to … View Resource

  • Christ and Him Crucified Article by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    To attempt to summarize the apostle Paul’s doctrine of salvation in the compass of a short essay might seem an act of folly. Yet try we must. Paul’s preaching of the Gospel proceeds from the conviction that Jesus of Nazareth is the promised “Messiah” and Son of God, whom God sent into the world in “the fullness of time” to fulfill His promises to His people, Israel (2 Cor. 1:18–22; 6:2; Gal. 4:4). The great message of Paul’s preaching is the “mystery” of the Gospel of Jesus Christ (Col. 1:26; Rom. 16:26; 2 Tim. 1 … View Resource

  • Apostle to the Gentiles Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    Paul’s conversion on the Damascus Road also represented his calling to serve as a missionary to the nations. The Lord made it clear when Paul was converted that he was “a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel” (Acts 9:15). Paul’s role as a missionary is captured by the words Jesus spoke to him on the Damascus Road according to Acts 26:18: “…to open their eyes, so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may … View Resource

  • Paul: A Servant of Jesus Christ Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    When I look back over forty years of teaching, I sometimes think I must be the most inarticulate writer and speaker in the history of the world. I wonder about that when I read interpretations of my teaching from the pens of other people, particularly from those who are hostile to what I declare. Frequently the distortions are so great that I cannot recognize my own position in the criticism. It may be helpful in trying to interpret mine or any other teacher’s declarations by looking at their geographical backgrounds. I grew up in the city of Pittsburgh, in a … View Resource

  • A Man in Christ Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    What does it mean to be a real man? According to the standards of our society, a real man is big and strong, bold and brave, confident and competitive. Through the voices of the moguls of media and the movies, young men are taught that a real man is a true stoic — someone who doesn’t show his emotions; he is apathetic about the cares of the world, apathetic to the problems of others, and, especially, apathetic to all things religious. Just about every popular television program, commercial, and cartoon portrays men as infantile, aloof, and ignorant, and if our … View Resource

  • Eternal Persuasion Article by John Cobb

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2006

    Marketing is a difficult term to define. Books have been written, gurus have weighed in, and countless others have offered various opinions. Boiled down, however, one simple definition of marketing is “the attempt to influence the behaviors of others.” In order for an individual to purchase food, products, or services, volunteer, or donate to a particular cause, they must be influenced to behave a certain way. But this definition creates problems. The practice of influencing people has led to us being bombarded with more than one thousand unique messages per day. Most of these messages tell us what to … View Resource