• The Promise of God’s Presence Article by John R. Sittema

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Out of the blue, the old man heard the voice of God. This wasn’t one of the gods his people tried to placate in fear. This one talked. What did He want? The old man’s name was Abram, later changed to Abraham. The God who spoke was Yahweh—literally, “He who is.” Yahweh told him to leave Ur, which was near the Persian Gulf, and move to a small strip of land along the Mediterranean. God would be there, and Abraham would enjoy His presence. TO GLORIFY GOD AND ENJOY HIM The story is told in Genesis 12. Abraham … View Resource

  • Spokesmen for God Article by John L. MacKay

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    The Lord did not commission His prophets to act as missionaries, going to those who had never heard God’s Word, nor were they to be innovators inaugurating a radically different religion. Their primary duty was to administer spiritual first aid to those who, though nominally acquainted with the terms of the covenant, were not complying with them, either through spiritual complacency or open defiance (Jer. 2:25; Zeph. 1:12). Prophetic ministry sought to soften hardened hearts and reclaim seared consciences by urging a return to the old paths (Jer. 6:16)—behavior which conformed to God’s requirements … View Resource

  • From Eden to the New Jerusalem: An Interview with T.D. Alexander Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    Tabletalk: Describe how you became a Christian and how God called you to work in the academy. T.D. Alexander: I grew up in a rural community in the northeast of Ireland, strongly influenced by Ulster-Scots culture, where almost everyone was Presbyterian by birth. As the eldest of three boys, I was cared for sacrificially by our mother following our father’s early death. In my mid-teens, I made that wonderful discovery of the grace of God, understanding personally the significance of what Christ did for me on the cross. Thereafter, filled with a desire to serve Christ, I explored … View Resource

  • That the Scriptures Might Be Fulfilled Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    The glory of Jesus Christ shines more clearly when we see Him in His proper relation to the Old Testament. He has a magnificent relation to all that was written. It is not surprising that this is the case, because He is called the Word of God incarnate (John 1:14). Would not the Word of God incarnate be the sum and consummation of the Word of God written? Consider these summary statements and the texts that support them. 1. All the Scriptures bear witness to Christ. Moses wrote about Christ (John 5:39, 46). 2. All the Scriptures are … View Resource

  • Meeting Jesus at an Old Testament Feast Article by John R. Sittema

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    The default sin of the human heart is to put ourselves first. “It really is all about me!” was once a funny t-shirt slogan; it has now become a way of life. Unless preachers and Bible teachers are careful, the way we handle Scripture can actually feed this beast. We rush to application, consumed by the question, “How is this relevant to me?” But the Bible is theocentric, not anthropocentric. It is more concerned to trace God’s ways — His character, purposes, and His cosmic redemptive plan (“For God so loved the cosmos”) — than it is to give modern … View Resource

  • The Royal Genealogy of Jesus Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    The five books from Genesis to Deuteronomy form the first section of the Hebrew Bible known as the Torah. Unfortunately, the Hebrew term torah is often misleadingly translated into English as “law.” Torah is better understood as meaning “instruction.” As instruction, the books of Genesis to Deuteronomy provide an essential foundation for understanding all of Scripture. As the opening stages in the grand story of divine redemption, these books set the scene and give direction to all that follows. The diverse but coherent contents of Genesis to Deuteronomy are linked in a rich variety of ways to Jesus … View Resource

  • Moses Article by Robert Vasholz

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    Generally speaking, the mention of canon or “canonicity” of the Bible is considered a topic for seminary professors and specialists in theology. It appears to have small relevance to “faith and practice.” But when one realizes that canonicity deals with such fundamental questions like “how did God’s people know what belonged in the Bible?” and “how can we be sure we still have what the inspired writers wrote?” it becomes clear that one’s views on canonicity are vitally linked to the integrity of Scripture.  An ongoing attack by biblical critics on the trustworthiness of the Bible … View Resource

  • One God, Two Testaments Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    Like me, many of you reading this article did not grow up in a church that is part of the Reformed tradition. You did not have the benefit of being catechized in the Westminster Standards or the Heidelberg Catechism. Calvinism may have been a dirty word, if not in your home, then in your church. You have come to embrace the doctrines of grace after years of personal study because you have been unable to deny the truth of divine election, which is found throughout Scripture. My journey into the Reformed tradition followed this path, but it was not only the … View Resource

  • Can Snakes Talk? Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2006

    With the possible exception of John 3:16, no verse in the Bible is more crucial and definitive than Genesis 3:15: “I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and her offspring; he shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heal.” As Alec Motyer writes, “The whole of Scripture is not packed into every scripture, but we may allowably expect every scripture to prepare and make room for the whole. This is what happens in Genesis 3:15” (Look to the Rock, IVP, p. 34). Several important issues emerge all at once … View Resource

  • An Historic Faith Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2006

    Once upon a time….” These words signal the beginning of a fairy tale, a story of make believe, not an account of sober history. Unlike beginning with the words “once upon a time,” the Bible begins with the words, “In the beginning God….” This statement, at the front end of the entire Bible, introduces the Pentateuch or the first five books of the Old Testament, and it sets the stage for God’s activity in linear history. From the opening chapters of Genesis to the end of the book of Revelation, the entire dynamic of redemption takes place … View Resource