• Emulating Our Elders Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    The ancient Greek philosopher Socrates is often quoted as having said: “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” The quote is almost certainly apocryphal, but it resonates with generations of human experience. Throughout history, older generations have peered over the rims of their spectacles … View Resource

  • The Grace of Cheerful Giving Article by Frank Cavalli

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2010

    In the last few years, the U.S. economy has faced its greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression, and Americans are not out of the woods yet. This financial debacle, fueled by failed mortgages, has rippled through every sector of the economy. The values of homes and investments have plummeted. Consumer confidence has fallen to an all-time low. Millions are out of work, wondering how they will make ends meet. Since charitable giving is one of the first areas to suffer in an economic downturn, churches have felt the pinch and many have been forced to slash budgets and lay … View Resource

  • Give Without Pay Article by Jon Bloom

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    When it comes to the mixing of gospel ministry and money, we who are leaders of churches or their ancillary ministries must have the fear of God struck into us. Heaven and hell are at stake in how we raise, spend, and reserve money — because the way we handle money either adorns or obscures the gospel. View Resource

  • Greed & Liberality Article by Jonathan Leeman

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    My guess is that you can’t guess who the fastest growing debtors in America are. According to the Wall Street Journal (1/19/07, W2), it’s the super rich — not to be confused with the obscenely rich.  The wealthiest one percent of households are piling on a greater percentage of debt than any other income category as they pursue the lifestyles of the top one-tenth of one percent. Yes, it’s a tough day to be super rich when keeping up with the Jones’ doesn’t mean traveling first class but chartering a Lear Jet. Of course, it’s not just … View Resource