• All Nations” and Church Planting Article by Ed Stetzer

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2014

    The Great Commission. Neither the words “great” nor “commission” are in the text, but the descriptor fits. This “authoritative order, charge, or direction” is “unusually large, extreme, and notable” (borrowing phrases from textbook definitions of both words). But why? The sheer scope of the assignment is embodied in the two little words: all nations. This phrase is translated from the Greek panta ta ethnē. It is often the subject of significant discussion. When many people hear ethnē, or “nations,” they think of countries. But when Jesus spoke those words, there were no countries as we understand them today. The nation-state … View Resource

  • A Friend to Africa’s Orphans: An Interview with Rosemary Jensen Article by Rosemary Jensen

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    Tabletalk: How did you become a Christian, and what ministries have you been involved with over the years? Rosemary Jensen: It seems as if I literally grew up in church. My parents were Southern Presbyterians in Jacksonville, Florida, during the time when that branch of the church was very conservative. By God’s grace, I heard the gospel preached faithfully every Sunday morning and every Sunday evening. I put my faith in the Lord Jesus Christ early in life, and at age seventeen, after hearing a missionary speak, I committed my life to “foreign missions” in Africa. My pastor helped … View Resource

  • Sheep, Wolves, Snakes, and Doves Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2011

    When Jesus sends us to bear witness to Him in the world, He does not send us out as dominant and strong but as weak and seemingly defenseless in ourselves. The only reason I say “seemingly” defenseless is that it is possible that, since “all authority” belongs to Jesus (Matt. 28:18), He might intervene and shut the mouths of the wolves, like he did the mouths of the lions that surrounded Daniel. But that does not appear to be His intention. He goes on to say that the “wolves” will deliver the “sheep” to courts, f log them, drag … View Resource

  • Does the Church Know Her Commission? Article by Denny Burk

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011 | Matthew 16

    Have you ever wished you could have a do-over? Have you ever looked back on a situation in which you know that you really botched the job and you just wish you could have another crack at it? That is the way I often feel when I reflect back on some of my less-than-fruitful efforts at evangelism when I was in college. Back then, I was (to say the least) a little wet behind the ears in terms of my theological convictions. I had a basic understanding of Christ’s substitutionary atonement but little appreciation for how His lordship should inform … View Resource

  • Missions Article by David Robertson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Dear Diabolos, It is clear that you have not quite got the hang of this temptation thing. Take the matter of what the enemy calls “mission.“ We understand what this is — to bring the dreadful news of His Son with all the spiritual weapons that we find so appalling. However, you are making a major error when you try to take all thoughts of mission out of the mind of your client. That is too obvious a tactic and one that often just does not work. Perhaps you will allow we more senior experts to give you some … View Resource

  • Not Return Void (Africa Journal #4) Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    Logistics intimidate me. Had I been present at the sermon that preceded the feeding of the five thousand I wouldn’t have heard a word. My mind would have been rather occupied with that one burning question — How are we ever going to feed all these people? There I would have been failing to hear the words of life from the Bread of Life all because I was worried about where bread would come from. Because this is such a great weakness of mine, it is, in turn, cause for great appreciation for those gifted in the area of logistics … View Resource

  • Contextualize This (Africa Journal #3) Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    I scanned my notes rather quickly, looking for problems. I would soon be preaching amidst a gathering throng of Kenyans. Was there an allusion somewhere in here to America culture? Were there idioms that would make no sense to these saints? Was there a hint of technical jargon connected to theological controversies that had not yet crossed the Atlantic? Truth be told, I was more nervous than I have been in a long time. Nairobi West Presbyterian Church is neither tiny (which tends to make me more nervous than large crowds) nor massive (which tends to make some others more … View Resource

  • The Holy Catholic Church (Africa Journal #2) Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    One of the great blessings of my calling is that I am called to travel far and wide from time to time. Over the course of little more than a year, I have traveled to teach in the United Kingdom, Japan, and now in Africa. I come home each time encouraged to see the Spirit of God at work in places that are far to me, but near to Him. While my joy increases, however, so does my concern. The more aware I become of how God is at work in distant lands, the more I become aware of the … View Resource

  • Thirteen Souls (Africa Journal #1) Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    One of my many weaknesses is that I don’t, at least in my heart, believe that missionaries have weaknesses. I see them as super-heroes. How wonderful they must be to leave the comforts of home and family to go and serve. My mind knows better, but the heart has its reasons. Missionaries, I know objectively, are not super-spiritual people who do not sin. They are instead super-spiritual people whose consciousness of their own sin fuels gospel gratitude which in turn leads to sacrificial love for others. As I type, I sit safely inside a DC 3, built in 1945, now … View Resource

  • The Magic Bullet Article by Sebastian Heck

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    Within the space of forty-eight hours, one could tour more than a dozen of Europe’s most beautiful historic cathedrals, emblems of Christianity’s once ubiquitous presence. But for the people who live in Europe, and I speak as a German national living in Germany, the familiar-looking steeples and the church bells sounding forth into the night are but tragic reminders of an all-too-distant past. View Resource

  • From Jerusalem, to All Nations, and Back Again Article by Fred Klett

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2010

    I once asked an Orthodox Jewish “anti-missionary” what he thought was the overarching message of the Hebrew Bible. Not usually at a loss for words and usually ready with an answer, this question somehow threw him. “We don’t think of the Bible in those terms” was his first attempt at an answer. Exactly. That is precisely why many first-century religious leaders in Jerusalem failed to recognize the time of redemption had come. Not to be too hard on the rabbis — at first the apostles didn’t fully understand the sort of redemption Jesus had accomplished either. View Resource

  • A Lingering Obligation Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008 | Matthew 28

    In 1792 a little-known shoe cobbler published a book in which he argued that the Great Commission remains a duty for every generation of Christians. Within two years the author, William Carey, left his native England and became a missionary to India. Today he is widely regarded as the father of modern missions. Carey’s An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens is one of the most pivotal writings in the history of world evangelization. The first section of this brief work focuses on Jesus’ words in Matthew 28:18–20: “All authority … View Resource

  • The Church in Asia Article by J. Nelson Jennings

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008

    William Carey and Hudson Taylor are among the many household names connected with Christian missions in Asia. Before them, Francis Xavier, Matteo Ricci, and others left indelible marks on world-wide Christian history. However, such colorful figures are only part of the picture of missions in Asia. An adequate overview requires focusing on the central character involved — God Himself. We also need to expand our time frame for God’s dealings with the vast array of people throughout Asia. The Bible reports God’s special redemptive acts that took place long ago in western Asia. After calling Abram from Ur (present-day Iraq … View Resource

  • The Church in Africa Article by Peter Hammond

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008

    An epic conflict is raging through-out Africa. It is the battle for the soul of a continent. Animism, communism, Islam, and Christianity are locked in a war of worldviews.  In some countries this conflict is visible and physical. Tens of thousands of Christians have been killed and hundreds of churches burned down by Muslim mobs in northern Nigeria. The Christians in southern Sudan and the Nuba Mountains endured decades of jihad by the National Islamic Front government of Sudan. Churches, schools, and hospitals were bombed by the Sudanese Air Force. Pastors were crucified. Children were kidnapped from Christian homes … View Resource

  • The Church in Latin America Article by Bill Green

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008

    My wife and I began work in the area of church planting and theological education in Central America in 1985. At that time there were many saying that the evangelical revival movement then underway was something larger and more important than even the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. The gospel was certainly being preached in every corner of Latin America, the Roman Catholic Church had suddenly lost it’s hegemony, and evangelicals began taking part in the political process in some countries. Some Protestant survey groups were providing statistics for the evangelical population at numbers as high as fifty percent … View Resource