• Good News and Good Deeds Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    The writer of the letter to the Hebrews exhorts us to “consider how to stir up one another to love and good works” (Heb. 10:24). In other words, we are to carefully ponder or study how we might encourage or stimulate each other to love God and our neighbor, in fulfillment of the two great commands that Jesus gives in Matthew 22:37–40. Authentic love for God and neighbor is not a mere warming of our affections, however, but as the writer of Hebrews assumes, always manifests itself in good deeds. Of course, this command to encourage others applies … View Resource

  • Flattery and Foolish Talk Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2013

    We are witnessing the deconstruction of a civilization. Across our land, the major institutions that are foundational to any nation are in a downward spiral, whether we speak of education, government, business, or the family. Isaiah and Jeremiah were observers of a similar destruction in their nation and wrote about it. One of the characteristics of that fall was the decline in the civility of everyday language. Isaiah said that the child was “insolent toward the elder, and the base toward the honorable” (Isa. 3:5). Their conversations did not demonstrate a godly respect for the position and authority of … View Resource

  • Bringing Marriage Back to Earth Article by Brian Tallman

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    Determining the church’s intersection of and proper degree of engagement with the culture is something that the church has been wrestling with for centuries now. Judging by the number of books on this topic that continue to roll off the presses, it is something she will continue to wrestle with for a long time to come. Perhaps this isn’t all bad news. It is the nature of our pilgrimage not to know everything. As pilgrims, we confess we are going somewhere and at the same time that we have not gotten there yet. Few areas provide opportunity for … View Resource

  • The Gospel and the Gender Wars Article by Russell Moore

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    Lewis Grizzard, the famous Atlanta newspaper columnist, wrote frequently of his ill-fated marriages, divorces, and remarriages. Eventually, he said he was going to give up on marriage altogether, that there wouldn’t be another Mrs. Grizzard. “I’m just going to find a woman who hates me and buy her a house,” he quipped. Grizzard’s lament elicited laughter, despite the obvious tragedy of his relational life, because it rang true to an American culture increasingly rife with gender wars. The universal tensions between men and women sometimes show up in their most innocuous form in jokes from women about … View Resource

  • A Community for Broken Homes Article by James Coffield

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    It’s 10:30 a.m. on Sunday morning and a monumental battle is being waged. Margi wants to go to church, but is it really worth the trouble? Her disabled son is more difficult to deal with in the mornings. She doesn’t go to the earlier adult Sunday school class, for there is nowhere for her child to go. It could be that she reads too much into the glance from the lady with the perfect hair and family. Some people seem to communicate pity, some seem to be annoyed, and some are kind. She feels shame and wonders if … View Resource

  • Hope For the Broken Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Every home is dysfunctional because everyone is sinful. There is no perfect family this side of heaven, and if we were perfect parents, neither we nor our children would need a Savior. When we consider the state of the family at the beginning of the twenty-first century, our tendency is to reflect nostalgically on imagined idyllic days of generations past when families weren’t perfect but pretty close to it, or so we like to think. As fallen people, born into fallen families, and living in a fallen world, the simple truth is that there has never been a time when … View Resource

  • Hope in This Broken-Down World Article by Paul David Tripp

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Years before I met her, Joan had come to Christ and met and married Henry, a successful, wealthy Christian businessman. They built a mansion in an affluent suburb, had a circle of great Christian friends, and were involved together in several exciting ministry projects. As the years zipped by, Joan gave birth to three healthy and vibrant children. All in all, there was little she lacked. It wasn’t a big deal at first, but in the little moments she began to notice two things about Henry. He seemed distant, not as communicative. Furthermore, Henry seemed to be at the edge … View Resource

  • Tevje Needed to Know Article by Joel Belz

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    An eery discomfort links the two famous questions. Tevje, in Fiddler on the Roof, bluntly asks his wife: “Do you love me?” How can it not remind you of Jesus, in John 21, using the very same words to put Peter on the spot: “Do you love me?” View Resource

  • For the Record Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2008

    People in the news are often asked to give their views on hot issues of the day. Matthew 19 presents such a scenario: Christ is at the height of His public ministry, when “great multitudes followed him” (v. 2 KJV) and pressed for His views. Christ speaks “for the record” on several issues that have surfaced many times in Christian history and on which Christians have often disagreed. Christ is traveling “the coasts of Judaea” (19:1) where another band of Pharisees decides to put Him to the test, asking Him to weigh in on the controversial practice of men divorcing … View Resource

  • Marriage to Glorify God Article by John Cobb

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2007

    The sanctity of marriage is being threatened, and all people likely suspect it. Everyone knows divorce rates are shamefully high, and same-sex unions are being legalized on a global scale. To help protect marriage, some are fighting in civil courts, some are writing books, some are preaching, some are teaching, and the list goes on.  Whether it is working is up for debate. Not up for debate is God’s purpose for marriage — to glorify Him (see 1 Cor. 10:31). How much more should we strive, then, to accomplish this purpose with and through a divine institution given … View Resource

  • Family vs. Culture Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2007

    The family is the foundation of culture. This is not a bromide of the Christian right, but plain fact, as every anthropologist will tell you. Families associate with groups of families, forming networks of social interdependence as families make a living, socialize children, and protect themselves. The family and the culture are supposed to work hand-in-hand.  But today, in the twenty-first century West, we are struggling through a cultural dysfunction of almost unparalleled magnitude. The culture and the family are now in conflict, to the detriment of both. Cultural artifacts are set against the family. According to anthropologists, the … View Resource

  • Accepted in the Beloved Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2007

    When I begin premarital counseling with a couple in our church, one of the first things we talk about is the purpose of the marriage covenant. I usually astonish the couple when I explain that their marriage is not primarily about them. After the initial shock, the young couple usually just looks at me with blank stares. I then explain that marriage is first and foremost about God and His kingdom (Eph. 5:30–32). We spend some time talking about the creation ordinance to be fruitful and multiply, and I explain that their marriage is intended to bring glory to … View Resource

  • The Song of Solomon Article by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2007

    I confess the Song of Solomon has always intimidated me as a preacher. Its vivid and excitable statements of marital sexual intimacy and the penchant of commentators to interpret it allegorically have combined to make me cautious. Even the ancients recommended that a young man not read the Song of Songs until he was either married or age 30. Yet, “all Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable…” (2 Tim. 3:16).  The Song of Songs is presented as a dramatic narrative that includes Solomon’s bride, the never-named Shulammite, secondly Solomon, thirdly, the daughters of Jerusalem, and fourthly … View Resource

  • Family Covenant Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2007

    What if you had an angel involved in the arrangement of your marriage or your children’s marriage, wouldn’t that be amazing? If you’re a believer, you actually do; the “Angel of the Lord” Himself. In Genesis 24, Abraham, in his advanced age, commissions his servant to find a suitable wife for Isaac, his son. Abraham’s desire is undergirded by God’s design. An angel accompanies Abraham’s servant as he seeks out and, ultimately, finds Rebekah. This kind of superintendence is not reserved for prophets; it is how God perpetuates His promises and His people.   God’s promise to Abraham was not … View Resource

  • Those Whom God Hath Joined Together Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    One of the great joys of serving as a pastor is performing weddings. Over the past few years, I have had the privilege of performing several wedding ceremonies, and on each occasion I have used the traditional wedding vows found in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Although many creative young couples these days are creating their own wedding vows, such creativity ceases when the young couple steps into my office. Through the months of premarital counseling and extensive discussions on the wedding itself as a covenant-making ceremony, I discuss with the couple the significance of their marriage vows and … View Resource