• Amazing Love Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    The love of Christ for us in His dying was as conscious as His suffering was intentional. “By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us” (1 John 3:16). If He was intentional in laying down His life, it was for us. It was love. “When Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end” (John 13:1). Every step on the Calvary road meant, “I love you.” Therefore, to feel the love of Christ … View Resource

  • A Better Election Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    The first presidential election in America took place in 1788–89. The polls opened on December 15, 1788, and closed on January 10, 1789. In this election, George Washington was chosen as the first president of the United States of America. Arguably the most popular president in American history, Washington is the only president ever elected with one hundred percent of the Electoral College. Thus, the process of electing our presidents was established. For many, the ballot box is what makes America a great place. We elect our officials. Being chosen for such an honor as the presidency should be a … View Resource

  • Be Ye Perfect Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008 | Matthew 5

    In Matthew 5:33–48, Jesus tells us how we are to fulfill the law — not legalistically, but in a spirit of Christ-like love. The goal is that we might strive to obey His final admonition in verse 48: “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect” (kjv). This Christ-like perfection is nothing less than God’s purpose for us, that we “be conformed to the image of his Son” (Rom. 8:29). When have you last heard someone casually say, “I swear,” or “I promise with all my heart”? Such words are illustrations of what Christ is … View Resource

  • A Charitable Reaction Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Has anyone ever said something unkind to you or about you? I think we all have had that experience. Becoming victims of slander or malicious gossip can be difficult to bear. However, God calls us to exhibit a very specific kind of response in such circumstances. Years ago, I received a letter from a friend who is a pastor at a church in California. In it, the pastor included a copy of an article that had appeared in the Los Angeles Times. Although the article included a photo of him standing in his church and holding his Bible, it … View Resource

  • Enduring Love Article by John R. Sittema

    There once were two weddings. The first took place on a pristine beach on a lake high in the mountains. The setting was breathtaking. The young couple showed that sweet nervous excitement that made everyone smile. A classical guitarist picked gathering music as we assembled for the ceremony. It began simply with the reading of selected verses from 1 Corinthians 13. The couple had written their own vows, which ended in a promise: “I will be faithful to you as long as we both shall love.” The second was a high church affair. Johann Sebastian Bach reverberated from ranks of … View Resource

  • Envy & Kindness Article by Carol Ruvolo

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    Take out a sheet of paper and number from one to seven. Now list the seven deadly sins in what you would say is their order of badness. Did you put envy last? Does it seem “less bad” to you than lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, and pride? If so, elevate it immediately to Deadly Sin number one. It has you fooled, which makes it the deadliest sin in the bunch. It probably marketed itself to you as something good (a form of admiration), or something partially good (a synonym for jealousy), instead of something thoroughly bad (frustrated self-exaltation fueled … View Resource

  • Everlasting Love Article by John Cobb

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    We are told in 1 Corinthians 13 that anything done without love is worthless, that “love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things”, and that “love never ends” (vv. 4–7). Love will never be extinguished in this world, or in the world to come. This is a difficult truth for us to comprehend. One reason is because we are so accustomed to things failing: our friendships, our cars, our electricity, our best ideas, ourselves, and the list goes on. Another reason is that our minds are not able to comprehend something that lasts forever. For … View Resource

  • Foundations of Political Action Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    On August 24 of the year 410, the Visigoths under Alaric entered Rome, and they plundered the city for several days. Within weeks, word of the catastrophe had been conveyed throughout the Roman Empire, even to a small North African town called Hippo, which had been blessed with a bishop named Aurelius Augustine. The greatest theologian of the early church, Augustine was faced not only with the unthinkable reality of Rome’s fall, but also with the unique challenge that those in Rome blamed Christians for the empire’s demise. They claimed that Christianity had weakened the political will of Rome and … View Resource

  • God Is Love Article by Susan Hunt

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    A friend gave me a plaque that proclaims: “Grandmothers are antique little girls.” I don’t know what the originator had in mind, but my spin is that the longer we live, the more we return to the simplicity of girlhood. I am convinced that things are not as complicated as I made them when I was a young woman. I am in my sixties, so I tried out my life-gets-simpler theory on one of my spiritual mothers who is in her nineties. Her response was, “When I was a little girl I learned that God is love.” I waited for … View Resource

  • God Is Love Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    In contrast to the East, the Western church (Rome and Protestantism) has had difficulty doing justice to the distinct identities of the three persons of the Trinity. Augustine compared them to memory, knowledge, and will — merely three aspects of a single mind — while Aquinas held that the three are “relations” in the one divine being. This trend has been pervasive — John Calvin and John Owen are notable exceptions — but, with the reappearance of the Eastern church on the radar, it is becoming recognized that equal justice should be done to the irreducible distinctions of the three … View Resource

  • Good News and Good Deeds Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    The writer of the letter to the Hebrews exhorts us to “consider how to stir up one another to love and good works” (Heb. 10:24). In other words, we are to carefully ponder or study how we might encourage or stimulate each other to love God and our neighbor, in fulfillment of the two great commands that Jesus gives in Matthew 22:37–40. Authentic love for God and neighbor is not a mere warming of our affections, however, but as the writer of Hebrews assumes, always manifests itself in good deeds. Of course, this command to encourage others applies in all … View Resource

  • Heaven Rejoices Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2010 | Zephaniah 3

    I’ve written a handful of books on a variety of topics, and one thing that occasionally happens when you publish a book is that people ask you to sign it. I think of signing autographs as something that famous people do, so it feels a bit awkward to sign a book. I’m happy to do it, however. If you’ve written a Christian book, many people will want something in addition to your signature. View Resource

  • He Loves Me, He Really Loves Me Article by Tim Challies

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2011

    I have had the privilege of attending a series of Ligonier Ministries National Conferences, and along the way I have noticed a little phenomenon or tradition that takes place at the beginning of these events. For many of the people who attend, these conferences mark an annual opportunity to connect with friends. Many people have attended the conference year after year, and along the way they have met new friends or have reconnected with old friends. The conference offers a once-per-year opportunity to spend a little time together and to catch up on the year that has gone by. I … View Resource

  • The Heresies of Love Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    God is a unity of distinct persons. The one God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. So says the doctrine of the Trinity. Some people believe in the unity and oneness of God, but deny that He consists in different persons. Heretics such as monarchists, modalists, and Arians take this position, as do followers of non-Christian religions, such as Unitarians and Muslims. Others believe in the different persons but deny their unity in one God. This is the position of heretics such as the tritheists and followers of other non-Christian religions, such as Mormons and polytheists. The church is a … View Resource

  • How Then Should We Love? Article by Kelly Kapic

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2013

    Has it ever struck you how strange it sounds to be commanded to love? Say you are a devoted Pittsburgh Steelers fan and someone told you to love the Dallas Cowboys. This would not sound like a joyful invitation, but rather a cruel joke. How can I love what I do not even like? Scripture does not merely invite us to love God and neighbor; we are commanded to do so. And this is where it gets a bit tricky. How can we be commanded to love? Sometimes in reaction to our culture, which often confuses love with sappy sentimentality, … View Resource