• The Song of Solomon Article by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2007

    I confess the Song of Solomon has always intimidated me as a preacher. Its vivid and excitable statements of marital sexual intimacy and the penchant of commentators to interpret it allegorically have combined to make me cautious. Even the ancients recommended that a young man not read the Song of Songs until he was either married or age 30. Yet, “all Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable…” (2 Tim. 3:16).  The Song of Songs is presented as a dramatic narrative that includes Solomon’s bride, the never-named Shulammite, secondly Solomon, thirdly, the daughters of Jerusalem, and fourthly, the brothers of … View Resource

  • The Undoing of Babel Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2006

    Man’s nature,” Calvin wrote in the Institutes of the Christian Religion, “is a perpetual factory of idols” (1.11.8). Nowhere is this seen more clearly than in the Babel episode (Gen. 11:1–9). Babylon becomes in time the most important city in Mesopotamia, and in Bible history a synonym for worldly opposition to God. Thus, at the close of the Scriptures, in the successive destruction of the enemy’s powers, is the downfall of Babylon: “Fallen, fallen is Babylon the great!” (Rev. 18:2). The progeny of the serpent (Gen. 3:15) populate history, often gathering collectively in cities to sound the notes of implacable … View Resource

  • Obedient Love Article by Derek Cazel

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    Perhaps no subject in history has been discussed more than love. Yet love remains one of the most misunderstood concepts in our culture. On a daily basis, through music, movies, and television, society discusses love as virtue, love as vice, love as physical intimacy, but mainly society speaks of love as an emotion. The Bible, however, describes love as something greater than just a feeling. The apostle Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 13 that without love, his accomplishments and talents mean nothing. Through Paul’s teaching we learn that our actions, if unaccompanied by godly love, have no value. Why are … View Resource

  • Somebody to Love Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    Why should I love other people? It’s a good question, and a question that all of us have asked from time to time as we’ve been challenged in our relationships. If that’s an important issue for you right now, this fourth chapter of 1 John is especially good to consider carefully. One answer John gives is that we should love others because it is the visible sign of our love for the invisible God. Look at the following verses: “We love, because he first loved us. If someone says, ‘I love God,’ and hates his brother, he is a liar; … View Resource

  • Love One Another Article by Kaki Cobb

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    My husband and I recently celebrated our second wedding anniversary. In the five years that I have known him we have learned, and will continue to learn, a great deal about love. My husband takes the meaning of love so seriously that he waited until the day he proposed to profess his love to me. That is a day I will never forget, and it was made even more special because he had saved those words just for me. Two years ago we pledged to love one another as long as we both shall live. Many couples recite these vows … View Resource

  • Love and Its Counterfeit Article by Mark Dever

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    I mentioned some months ago in my article that 2005 was the 450th anniversary of the martyrdom of John Bradford. It also is the 450th anniversary of the martyrdoms of Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer, two bishops in the English Reformation who were clear preachers of the Gospel, and two witnesses who were faithful unto death. The older Latimer said to the younger man Ridley as he was walking out to the stake to be burned, “Play the man, Ridley!” And so he did. Both these men could have saved their lives simply by renouncing their faith in Christ’s Gospel, … View Resource

  • Inexplicable Love Article by John Sartelle

    By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:35). The fish symbol worn as a lapel pin or displayed as a bumper sticker — a gold cross worn as a necklace — is that how Jesus said His followers would be identified? That would have been so easy. Just put on a necklace or pin a cross on your lapel, and you will be declaring your faith to the world. No heart-rending changes, no need to touch the AIDS patient. You can let the ugly, the irregular, the unlovable … View Resource

  • Foundations of Political Action Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    On August 24 of the year 410, the Visigoths under Alaric entered Rome, and they plundered the city for several days. Within weeks, word of the catastrophe had been conveyed throughout the Roman Empire, even to a small North African town called Hippo, which had been blessed with a bishop named Aurelius Augustine. The greatest theologian of the early church, Augustine was faced not only with the unthinkable reality of Rome’s fall, but also with the unique challenge that those in Rome blamed Christians for the empire’s demise. They claimed that Christianity had weakened the political will of Rome and … View Resource

  • The Second Great Commandment Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    When some Pharisees put Jesus to the test concerning the greatest of all God’s commandments, He answered with a quotation from Deuteronomy 6:5: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength.” “This is the first and great commandment,” He told them. “And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’” (Matt. 22:38–39). What did He mean when He said the two commandments are alike? Well, obviously, they both deal with love. The first calls for wholehearted love toward God, a love that consumes every … View Resource

  • The Lord of Light and Love Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    What is God? One of the most common answers today is, “God is love,” evoking images of a grandfatherly, cuddly type. The problem here is not the phrase itself but the meaning we attach to the word love. According to at least one apostle, “love” cannot be understood apart from “light,” and given our culture’s warped view of love, this comes as a healthy corrective. Every Christian knows that the character of God has implications for everyday life. That is to say, whoever God is and however God acts is for us the perfect picture of what we are supposed … View Resource

  • God Is Love Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    In contrast to the East, the Western church (Rome and Protestantism) has had difficulty doing justice to the distinct identities of the three persons of the Trinity. Augustine compared them to memory, knowledge, and will — merely three aspects of a single mind — while Aquinas held that the three are “relations” in the one divine being. This trend has been pervasive — John Calvin and John Owen are notable exceptions — but, with the reappearance of the Eastern church on the radar, it is becoming recognized that equal justice should be done to the irreducible distinctions of the three … View Resource

  • Love is in the Air Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    Everyone talks about love. Just about everywhere we turn, someone is talking about love. In fact, it may very well be the most popular thing in our culture — we just love to talk about love, yet never before has love been more exploited, nor has it ever been more distorted. Love has become a meaningless word. And instead of standing firm in love, many Christians have been duped by the world’s definition of love, which proclaims self rather than sacrifice. According to the world, we love in order to be loved. According to the Word, we love because God … View Resource

  • True Love Article by John MacArthur

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    All you need is love.” So sang the Beatles. If they’d been singing about God’s love, the statement would have a grain of truth in it. But what usually goes by the name love in popular culture is not authentic love at all; it’s a deadly fraud. Far from being “all you need,” it’s something you desperately need to avoid. The apostle Paul makes that very point in Ephesians 5:1–3. He writes, “Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to … View Resource

  • Mercy Established Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    From Hebrews 7:26–28 we see the importance given to the fact that Jesus identifies with those for whom He died by undergoing temptation. We are also made aware of the necessity that this High Priest be sinless, or else He would not have been qualified to enter into the heavenly sanctuary on our behalf. The author of this epistle clearly assumes that this once-for-all sacrifice is enacted on behalf of individuals: “… since he did this [offer a sacrifice for the sins of the people] once for all when he offered up himself” (Heb. 7:27b). What wondrous love is this? … View Resource