• Prayer and Culture Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    I recently headed the translation committee for our church body’s new hymnal and worship book. Our previous hymnal included the choice of a modernized version of the Lord’s Prayer. We found, though, that no one used it. Even the churches that had given themselves over to contemporary worship — claiming that old-fashioned language and time-honored practices were incomprehensible to “modern” or “postmodern” people today — when they deigned to pray the Lord’s Prayer used the old-fashioned, time-honored version, complete with “thy’s,” “art’s,” and “trespasses.” The Lord’s Prayer is the ultimate prayer, comprehending everything that we can pray for … View Resource

  • With One Voice Article by Jack Kinneer

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2003

    English-speaking Christians around the world know the Lord’s Prayer in the wording of the King James Version (Matt. 6:9–13; Luke 11:2–4). Believers from diverse church traditions have this prayer in common and can recite it in unison. We are able to remember it because the Lord’s Prayer in the King James is memorable and poetic. In this, the King James Version captures the character of the prayer in the original Greek, which is even more poetic. There can be little doubt that the prayer was intended to be learned by heart and so be readily available to the … View Resource