• Liberty vs. Law? Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    I have often heard people define liberty as the ability to do whatever you want to do whenever you want to do it. Although such a definition may sound good on the surface, it more accurately defines anarchy than it does liberty. While many in our society cry for “liberty,” they are actually advocating a form of social anarchy. By demanding their “liberty” to have the right to choose the life or death of an unborn child, they are demanding the right to murder merely for the sake of personal convenience. By fighting for the “liberty” to define marriage … View Resource

  • Life and Liberty Article by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    Life” and “Liberty” are terms that have powerful and positive connotative value to us. We are “pro-life” and “pro-liberty.” Such emotionally-laden terms can be definitionally evasive, however, since they stir our passions as well as our reason. As we consider our expectations of the state and our role therein, it is important to be clear about our understanding of such terms. “Life” has both a political and a religious definition. In the political arena, “life” is biologically defined; the state defends “life” by protecting people from acts and policies that would injure or take away their lives, biologically considered. The … View Resource

  • No Room for Indifference Article by Richard Phillips

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2010

    A year ago or so, I was approached after church by a young woman who had recently become convinced of Reformed theology. Coming from a fairly legalistic background, her spiritual life had been energized by the biblical message of God’s grace. “But,” she asked, “if I’m going to be Reformed, do I have to drink alcohol?” This question, I think, speaks volumes about the current state of Reformed Christianity (especially in its “young, restless, and Reformed” variety). It seemed, in her circles at least, that in order to be Reformed one was practically required to drink and smoke … View Resource

  • Sweet Land of Liberty Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    America is mad for liberty. Ours is a free country. We enjoy freedom of speech and of religion, the freedom of the press, and the freedom to bear arms. And rightly so. But though Americans love freedom, many of them have forgotten what it means.  Today many of us assume that freedom means getting to do whatever we want. Any restrictions on our behavior — whether from the state, the church, or some other person — violate our freedom. And, for many of us, freedom above all means the liberty to sin. But, according to the Bible, this is … View Resource