• Our Bloody Religion Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    It has been said that Christianity is a bloody religion. This reference is usually made by critics who point to the wars, inquisitions, trials, and executions carried out over the years in the name of Christianity. While we must admit that blood has been wrongly shed in the name of so-called christianity, the fact of the matter is that Christianity is indeed a bloody religion. However, this is true not because of the blood shed by humanity in wars and inquisitions, but because of the blood shed by Jesus Christ. In the preface to the book Precious Blood, Richard Phillips … View Resource

  • Our Great High Priest Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    As a former resource consultant for Ligonier Ministries, I had the opportunity to speak with many people on the telephone. Most of them were Christians eager to find materials to help them learn more about apologetics, the Bible, theology, Christian living, and many other topics. It was a joy to help someone find the right resource for the subject they were studying. Given that the Renewing Your Mind radio program has a potential audience of millions, not all of the people with whom I spoke were Christians. I also spoke with Muslims, Mormons, agnostics, and many other non-Christians. Though the … View Resource

  • Our Identity in Christ Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    Remembering all the personal identification numbers, passwords, login names, ID cards, and the like that are a part of my everyday routine gets tiring. In order to conduct any business on the Internet, enter my residence, pay bills, access email, or enter my gym, I either enter a plethora of keystrokes or flash one of my various ID cards. Despite these little inconveniences, it is a relief to know that there are still a few places such as the homes of friends and family and the church where “secret handshakes,” ID cards, and special personal identification numbers are not … View Resource

  • Peace by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    In April of 1992, after four Los Angeles Police Officers were acquitted of any criminal act in the apprehension, beating, and arrest of Rodney Ki ng, the city of Los Angeles burst into some of the worst riots in its history. After three days of fatalities, injuries, looting, and vandalism, King appeared before the microphones and cameras and asked the now-famous question: “Can’t we all get along?” It seems an innocuous question, the kind I have asked my children a time or two. And yet, in the midst of race and class riots in the streets, it was a … View Resource

  • Propitiation by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    The theology of the church is filled with big words (justification, sanctification, predestination, and more). These big words carry with them big meanings. These big meanings reveal to us the bigness of our God and the greatness of our salvation. One such word is propitiation. Propitiation is not a word that easily flows from our lips. You probably are not likely to find it the topic of conversation at your next church social. It likely will not cut into the conversation at the barber shop or beauty parlor. Unfortunately, it probably is not the subject of too many Sunday school … View Resource

  • Redeemed by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Cecil B. Demille’s The Ten Commandments (1956) is one of the most successful movies ever made. At the time, it was a grand cinematic achievement. Its cinematography and special effects wowed the movie world. Everyone marveled, not only at the presentation, but also at the story itself. The story indeed isa grand one, as it recapitulates the storyline of the entire drama of redemption. The deliverance of the children of Israel from slavery in Egypt is an unforgettable story of God’s purposeful and powerful salvation of His people. The account of God redeeming Israel from Egypt foreshadowed the redemption to … View Resource

  • The Spirit of Promise Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    I don’t know if this happens to everyone, but a deep sense of longing fills my soul when I listen to Celtic music. I get homesick. I dream of the day when I can go the land of my fathers to smell the air, touch the soil, and behold the rolling green pastures and rocky hillsides. But once I get there, my longing will not relent. Once I touch the cold, mossy stones of ancient castle ruins and once-majestic cathedrals, I will realize that they are fading shadows of a time that ever slips my grasp. And this Ocean State … View Resource

  • The Suffering Servant Article by Donald Macleod

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    John Murray, with good reason, argues that obedience is the most inclusive concept available to us for describing the redeeming work of Christ (Redemption Accomplished and Applied, p. 19). Other categories such as sacrifice and satisfaction cover some of the data, but obedience is by far the most comprehensive. It is also, of course, utterly biblical. Christ came pre-eminently as the Servant, in fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy (especially Isa. 52:13–53:12). In accordance with this, He saw Himself as one who had come not to do His own will, but the will of the Father who had sent Him … View Resource

  • The Supremacy of Christ Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    I wonder if it is proper to have a “favorite” book of the Bible. The idea scratches like fingernails on a chalk-board. What would induce us to prefer one portion of the Word of God to another? It would seem that to hear God say anything would be such a delight to the soul that every word that proceeds from His mouth would excite the soul to the same degree. Perhaps when we reach glory, our delight in Him and in His Word will be such that it will know no comparative degrees. In the meantime we are left with … View Resource

  • Thy King Cometh unto Thee Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008 | Matthew 21

    On the outskirts of the city, Jesus sends two disciples to a nearby village to fetch a female donkey and her colt. The owner of these animals, although unknown to the disciples, is on close terms with Christ, believing in His mission. Merely hearing “the Lord hath need of them” (Matt. 21:3 kjv) is enough for the man to permit his animals to be led away. With the requisite animals in hand, the disciples and a crowd of people set about the task of investing the occasion with all possible pomp and circumstance. The disciples strip off their cloaks to … View Resource

  • Time to (Re)Discover Hebrews Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Of all the New Testament letters, Hebrews seems to be one many Christians find strange and alien. Here we enter the world of Melchizedek and Aaron, angels and Moses, sacrifices and priests. It all seems so Old Testament, so intricate, and even confusing. If so, it is time to (re)discover Hebrews. But how? View Resource

  • “To Fulfill All Righteousness” Article by Knox Chamblin

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2004

    Behold, I havecome to do your will, O God,” said the Messiah when He came into the world (Heb. 10:5–7). The writings of the New Testament, especially the four Gospels, testify that Jesus was faithful to that resolve all His life. We see in Matthew how Jesus executed the offices of prophet, priest, and king. In each case His active obedience finds expression. (John 10:18; Phil. 2:8; Heb.10: 5–10 The King Who Serves The Father The glorious Son of God obeyed the Father in becoming a man (Phil. 2:6–7). Already in Jesus’ childhood, service … View Resource

  • Unqualified Supremacy Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    A few years ago I heard a sermon by the eminent Swiss theologian Dr. Roger Nicole. Prior to the sermon, I read the bulletin for the service which noted Dr. Nicole’s sermon title. I recall that I became somewhat agitated when I read the title: “Lord, No.” I remember thinking: “What sort of title is that?” I soon realized, however, that the title was intentionally ambiguous. To say “Lord” conveys supremacy, and to say “no” conveys disapproval or denial. Thus, the phrase “Lord, no” is an oxymoron. We cannot say, in the same breath, “Lord” and “no” — … View Resource

  • What Love Is This? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2007

    Love is something often talked about in today’s culture. There are countless love songs played on the radio each day. Many magazines claim on their covers to contain the magic formula for lasting love. The daily news often contains stories of the latest love interests of the rich and famous.  Most of this is meaningless when we compare these definitions of love to those of Scripture. While references to love constantly surround us, more often than not, it is not the type of love Jesus shows us and requires of us each day. In John 13:34, shortly … View Resource

  • Who Is Jesus? Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    Who is Jesus ? This is the most contentious and divisive question that has ever been asked. No question has ever caused so much division. The apostle John wrote his letter with that question in mind. There were self-proclaimed prophets, in his day, who offered descriptions of Christ that were contrary to that of the apostles’. Some taught that Christ only “appeared” that way. Ideas like this flourished in the first centuries after Christ, as leaders in the church wrestled with the notion that God became man and died. In 1 John 4:1–6, John encourages his readers to learn to … View Resource