• Thy King Cometh unto Thee Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008 | Matthew 21

    On the outskirts of the city, Jesus sends two disciples to a nearby village to fetch a female donkey and her colt. The owner of these animals, although unknown to the disciples, is on close terms with Christ, believing in His mission. Merely hearing “the Lord hath need of them” (Matt. 21:3 kjv) is enough for the man to permit his animals to be led away. With the requisite animals in hand, the disciples and a crowd of people set about the task of investing the occasion with all possible pomp and circumstance. The disciples strip off their cloaks to … View Resource

  • Jesus’ Childhood Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008 | Matthew 2

    Matthew 2, along with a few verses in Luke 2, provides all the historical data we have concerning the early childhood of Jesus. And since the writers of the Gospels were masters of brevity and understatement, Matthew 2 fairly bristles with questions we long to have answered. Among them we’d like to know more about the wise men, the star they saw, and how they connected it to the one who was born king of the Jews. Obviously, if the Holy Spirit had wanted us to have more information, He would have guided Matthew to include it. So rather than being … View Resource

  • Kingdom Life Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    Jesus promised that the kingdom of God would come in power before some of His hearers faced death (Mark 9:1). After His resurrection, He again spoke to His disciples about the kingdom of God (Acts 1:3). On the day of Pentecost, Peter announced that Jesus had been seated at God’s right hand in heaven, fulfilling God’s ancient promise to put David’s descendant on his royal throne (Acts 2:30–35). These texts, as well as many others, express the New Testament’s unanimous witness that God’s long-awaited redemptive reign, invading this sin-stained world to recapture it for its rightful king … View Resource

  • Old Expectations Article by Iain Duguid

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    When Jesus started his earthly ministry, he began by “proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom” (Matt. 4:23). Yet nowhere in the Gospels do we see Jesus giving a clear definition of the kingdom. The reason is simple: Jesus didn’t have to define what the kingdom meant, because his hearers were well-schooled in the Old Testament. The puzzle for them was trying to work out how the coming of Jesus fitted into their Old Testament expectations. That is why Jesus later said, “Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like a master of a … View Resource

  • What Love Is This? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2007

    Love is something often talked about in today’s culture. There are countless love songs played on the radio each day. Many magazines claim on their covers to contain the magic formula for lasting love. The daily news often contains stories of the latest love interests of the rich and famous.  Most of this is meaningless when we compare these definitions of love to those of Scripture. While references to love constantly surround us, more often than not, it is not the type of love Jesus shows us and requires of us each day. In John 13:34, shortly … View Resource

  • Family Traits Article by Wynn Kenyon

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2007

    The family is central to the biblical ethic. It is the primary image of the relationship of the saints to God. The work of Christ was required to bring about regeneration and adoption, making believers heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ. And the book of Revelation culminates in the wedding feast of the Lamb. Given the significance of this concept, what does it mean to live a life “worthy of this calling?” What should family members look like? To answer these questions we turn to the biblical narrative. Why was the family instituted? God’s observation in Genesis … View Resource

  • Our Identity in Christ Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    Remembering all the personal identification numbers, passwords, login names, ID cards, and the like that are a part of my everyday routine gets tiring. In order to conduct any business on the Internet, enter my residence, pay bills, access email, or enter my gym, I either enter a plethora of keystrokes or flash one of my various ID cards. Despite these little inconveniences, it is a relief to know that there are still a few places such as the homes of friends and family and the church where “secret handshakes,” ID cards, and special personal identification numbers are not … View Resource

  • Forgiveness at the Feet of Jesus Article by Richard Ganz

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    I remember opening the door of my office at the medical center and being greeted by a young, beautiful, desperate woman, who had been referred to me for psychotherapy. She was single. She had been living a carefree, and sexually immoral life. She was now pregnant. She was looking to me for help. I didn’t have a clue. I was a clinical psychologist, not a priest. What was I supposed to do? I offered nothing to help her turn away from what was soon to be an even greater disaster in her life than her out-of-wedlock pregnancy. I’ve looked back … View Resource

  • The Spirit of Promise Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    I don’t know if this happens to everyone, but a deep sense of longing fills my soul when I listen to Celtic music. I get homesick. I dream of the day when I can go the land of my fathers to smell the air, touch the soil, and behold the rolling green pastures and rocky hillsides. But once I get there, my longing will not relent. Once I touch the cold, mossy stones of ancient castle ruins and once-majestic cathedrals, I will realize that they are fading shadows of a time that ever slips my grasp. And this Ocean State … View Resource

  • The Suffering Servant Article by Donald Macleod

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    John Murray, with good reason, argues that obedience is the most inclusive concept available to us for describing the redeeming work of Christ (Redemption Accomplished and Applied, p. 19). Other categories such as sacrifice and satisfaction cover some of the data, but obedience is by far the most comprehensive. It is also, of course, utterly biblical. Christ came pre-eminently as the Servant, in fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy (especially Isa. 52:13–53:12). In accordance with this, He saw Himself as one who had come not to do His own will, but the will of the Father who had sent Him … View Resource

  • Born of the Virgin Mary Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    Along with the great theologian and philosopher Anselm of Canterbury we ask the question, Cur deus homo? Why the God-man? When we look at the biblical answer to that question, we see that the purpose behind the incarnation of Christ is to fulfill His work as God’s appointed Mediator. It is said in 1 Timothy 2:5: “For there is one God and one Mediator between God and men, the Man Christ Jesus, who gave Himself ….” Now, the Bible speaks of many mediators with a small or lower case “m.” A mediator is an agent who stands … View Resource

  • Awaiting His Return Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    There is a widespread fascination with the end of the world. Throughout history, we have witnessed the bold assertions of soothsayers, naysayers, and doomsdayers. Every day, self-proclaimed prophets of the end times make whimsical predictions about the future. Claiming to have biblical authority, they tout their cleverly devised schemes about the end of the world as we know it, and by reading between the lines of the Old Testament prophetical books, they carefully contort the words of sacred Scripture to fit their fictional fantasies about the second advent of Christ. Christians throughout the world have become so enamored with some … View Resource

  • The Face of God Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2005

    As has been mentioned time and again in our study of the epistle of John, there were certain folks within that church who claimed a secret knowledge, one that set them apart from the rest of the crowd, setting them free from the physical limits of the world, enabling them (so they claimed) to reach new spiritual heights and salvation to the kingdom of light. Saint John responded simply: Matter is not evil, for Jesus Himself came in the flesh “to be the Savior of the world” (1 John 4:14b). Such a grand sweep with respect to God’s redemptive … View Resource

  • Who Is Jesus? Article by John Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    Who is Jesus ? This is the most contentious and divisive question that has ever been asked. No question has ever caused so much division. The apostle John wrote his letter with that question in mind. There were self-proclaimed prophets, in his day, who offered descriptions of Christ that were contrary to that of the apostles’. Some taught that Christ only “appeared” that way. Ideas like this flourished in the first centuries after Christ, as leaders in the church wrestled with the notion that God became man and died. In 1 John 4:1–6, John encourages his readers to learn to … View Resource

  • The Coming of the King Article by Ken Gentry

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Few doctrines of the Bible receive more attention among evangelicals today than the second coming of Christ. And since His return is a foundational doctrine of the historic Christian faith, it well deserves our notice. Unfortunately though, the second advent is more deeply loved and firmly believed than biblically understood. We tend to have a “zeal without knowledge” in approaching this doctrine. This is tragic in that properly comprehending it is vitally important for framing a Christian worldview. After all, it exalts the consummate glory of His redemptive victory, completes the sovereign plan of God for history, and balances a … View Resource