• The Birth of Israel Article by John Currid

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    The Scriptures have emphasized the wickedness of mankind since the time of the flood. Humanity is no different than what it was prior to the flood. For instance, the line of Ham demonstrates great selfishness and evil, and a strident rebelliousness against God. At Babel, mankind even desired to storm the very gates of heaven and shun the commands of God. Such stories simply describe mankind’s attempt to sit on the throne of the universe. God, however, cannot but succeed, and the book of Acts tells us “in past generations he allowed all the nations to walk in their own … View Resource

  • Holy Ground Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Of the rich variety of books that make up the Bible, the book of Exodus is unique in providing a micro-picture of the larger biblical story of salvation. Exodus describes how God brings estranged people into a personal relationship with Himself. The motif of knowing God permeates the book of Exodus. Although at the outset God appears far removed from the plight of the oppressed Israelites, He is well aware of their suffering. As the victims of forced labor and genocide, dehumanized and exploited by their captors, the Israelites cry out to God for help (Ex. 2:23). Fully conscious … View Resource

  • Israel’s Creed Article by Bryan Estelle

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2013

    The Shema begins with these words: “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one” (Deut. 6:4). The verbal imperative that begins this core affirmation for the Hebrews breaks forth from the text like a rosy dawn. Interestingly, the same appeal, “Hear, O Israel,” introduces the recounting of the Decalogue that begins in Deuteronomy 5:1. This indicates the significance of the utterance. Among the 5,845 verses in the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible), this creedal statement is definitely a keynote, as demonstrated by the significant roles this confession of faith subsequently played … View Resource

  • Israel’s Salvation Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    The eleventh chapter of Romans opens with the apostle Paul, a descendant of Abraham, asking the question: “Has God rejected [ethnic Israel]?” The short answer to this question is given in verse 5: “So too at the present time there is a remnant, chosen by grace.” This comes after Paul alludes to Elijah’s rebuke of Israel for killing God’s prophets and destroying His altars (vv. 3–4; see 1 Kings 19:10, 14). But the question about Israel’s status permeates much of the letter to the Romans, especially chapters 1–2 and 9–11. Israel’s status is particularly emphasized in chapters … View Resource

  • Our Blessed Struggle Article by Guy Richard

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    I find it interesting that, of all the names God could have chosen for His people, He chose “Israel.” And while different opinions exist as to what the name Israel actually means, it seems that the context in which the name is given in Genesis 32 favors the meaning “he struggles with God” over every other option (see verses 22–32 and Hos. 12:3–4). It would seem that God, in His infinite wisdom, chose to call His people &”strugglers.” As we consider what it means for us as Christians to live between the times, let us begin by remembering … View Resource