• When God is Not Enough Article by Scotty Smith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2013

    You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it rests in you” (Augustine, Confessions). “There is a God-shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but only by God, the Creator, made known through Jesus” (Blaise Pascal, Pensées). Certain of the elders of Israel came to me and sat before me. And the word of the Lord came to me: “Son of man, these men have taken their idols into their hearts, and set the stumbling block of their iniquity before their faces… . Therefore speak to … View Resource

  • Eastern Idolatry Article by Peter Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    C.S. Lewis gets many things right. Years ago, he concluded that there were only two possible answers to the religious search: either Hinduism or Christianity, which are ultimate, contradictory expressions of religion—that is, either One-ist pantheism or Two-ist theism (Letters of C.S. Lewis, pp. 479–80). Pantheism is the “very spiritual” belief that “god” is in everything. From this conviction derives the phrase “all is one and one is all.” This part of God in everything joins everything together. Since human beings are inherently spiritual, pantheism is the original default button of the rebellious creature. God is not above … View Resource

  • Young Women, Idolatry & the Powerful Gospel Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    We are all inveterate worshipers — it’s just something we do without thinking about it. Worshiping is part of our nature because God created us to worship Him, and, by doing so, we bring both Him and ourselves deep pleasure (Pss. 16:11; 149:4). The world is full of worshipers, and some of them actually worship God. But the truth is that most of us worship idols. It’s easy to identify idols that exist outside of us — like statues of Buddha, fast cars, or beautiful houses. Pinpointing the idols that reside within is a little trickier, however. These … View Resource

  • Standing Firm Article by Bill Haynes

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    Martin Luther, in his Table Talk #403, makes the statement that “an upright shepherd and minister must improve his flock by edification, and also resist and defend it; otherwise, if resisting be absent, the wolf devours the sheep.” Resisting and defending require that a pastor-shepherd stand firm on the truth of the Gospel and lead his congregation to do the same. You have seen in this issue of Tabletalk that in the eighth century many challenges to the Gospel arose. From the Muslim advance to the iconoclastic controversy, standing firm in the truth was not easy. But, in reality … View Resource

  • Graven Images? Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2008

    In 726, Emperor Leo’s order to destroy the image of Christ at the imperial palace provoked a riot, and a long and virulent controversy engulfed the Eastern church. Not until the Empress Irene called the second council of Nicea in 787 was the issue settled in favor of images. Even then, a revival of iconoclasm followed and only in 843 was the turmoil finally ended by Patriarch Methodius, an occasion marked thereafter as the Feast of Orthodoxy. The controversy was savagely violent. Monks were publicly lashed to death or had their nostrils slit; one was torn to pieces by a … View Resource

  • Breaking Boundaries Article by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    Pluralism has found a home among the people of God. While pluralism — the acceptance of nonbiblical ideas and practices as compatible with biblical faith and life — is not a new phenomenon, its persistence in church history and the pervasiveness of its influence today is a matter of deep concern for believers. What differentiates old from new pluralisms is how pluralism was opposed in the Bible and early church but enthusiastically embraced by the church in recent eras. Evidences of pluralism appeared early in Israel’s life. Idolatry existed alongside traditional worship in the temple in Jerusalem. Israelites worshiped the … View Resource

  • Pride & Humility Article by Robert Rayburn

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    Pride is the idolatry of the self. It is the nature of pride as competition with God — the displacing of God by the self at the center — that has led many Christian thinkers through the ages to regard pride (superbia) as the mother sin and the essential element in all sin. It is strongly suggested in the Bible that pride was Satan’s primary sin (1 Tim. 3:6), and from that pride in his case came every manner of hostility to God and man: evil desire, hatred, cruelty, and deceit. In the same way, man’s fall resulted from … View Resource

  • Greed & Liberality Article by Jonathan Leeman

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    My guess is that you can’t guess who the fastest growing debtors in America are. According to the Wall Street Journal (1/19/07, W2), it’s the super rich — not to be confused with the obscenely rich.  The wealthiest one percent of households are piling on a greater percentage of debt than any other income category as they pursue the lifestyles of the top one-tenth of one percent. Yes, it’s a tough day to be super rich when keeping up with the Jones’ doesn’t mean traveling first class but chartering a Lear Jet. Of course, it’s not just … View Resource

  • Perseverance in the Face of Persecution Article by C. FitzSimons Allison

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2007

    Gilbert Meilaender is a truly heroic figure. I would like to share my admiration for him with others as an encouragement to persevere in the face of persecution. Meilaender is an internationally known ethicist and one of a group of eminent students belonging to the Ramsey Colloquium, named for the Princeton scholar, Paul Ramsey. These are among the most distinguished scholars of their generation. A careful, pastorally sensitive, contemporary statement regarding the church’s teaching on homosexuality was published by this colloquium. As a result, many of them were harassed and treated with inexcusable persecution on campuses, including Oberlin, the … View Resource

  • Not to Us Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    Our society applauds the rich religious diversity found throughout the world. I know this because the satellite dish on the roof of my house keeps receiving signals from National Geographic, Discovery Channel, and a host of other programs daring me to explore the world around me. I love a good dare, so I watch the TV. I watch bizarre religious festivals that pay homage to strange deities. I see people put themselves in self-induced trances and perform all kinds of painful rituals on themselves to prove their devotion to an idol that can neither see nor hear. Everyone in the … View Resource

  • American Idols Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2005

    We are made in God’s image. The sheer fact that we could spend the rest of our lives contemplating what it means to be made in God’s image, without beginning to scratch the surface, reminds us that we are God’s image, not gods. We are, in some ways, to God as our mirror image is to us. There is a resemblance, a connection, but the difference is one of ontology, dimension. Thus, God creates, and we create. But when we look at creation more closely we find that He speaks things into reality, while we merely rearrange what He has … View Resource