• No Place for Heresy Article by C. FitzSimons Allison

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    One of the best examples of reform is that which occurred at Cluny in the tenth century in southern France following the darkest times of the Western church after the fall of Rome (see Nick Needham’s article above for more on the Cluniac revival). It brought a visible seriousness of spiritual discipline that lasted for more than two centuries. The acknowledged founder, Berno of Baume (d. 927), was followed by long-serving, effective leaders. The order reached its height under Hugh (d. 1109) with well over one thousand houses affiliated with the mother monastery of Cluny. View Resource

  • The Heresies of Love Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    God is a unity of distinct persons. The one God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. So says the doctrine of the Trinity. Some people believe in the unity and oneness of God, but deny that He consists in different persons. Heretics such as monarchists, modalists, and Arians take this position, as do followers of non-Christian religions, such as Unitarians and Muslims. Others believe in the different persons but deny their unity in one God. This is the position of heretics such as the tritheists and followers of other non-Christian religions, such as Mormons and polytheists. The church is a … View Resource

  • Truly God, Truly Man: The Council of Chalcedon Article by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    It’s hard enough to pronounce “Chalcedon.” Getting to grips with its theology can be even more daunting. But the effort will be very richly rewarded. For the past 1,500 years, right up to the present day, virtually all orthodox Christian theologians have defined their “orthodoxy” with reference to the Council of Chalcedon. That certainly includes the Reformed tradition. We may not think that the early ecumenical councils were infallible. But we have generally held that they were gloriously right in what they affirmed, and that Christians who take the church and its history seriously must reckon with these … View Resource

  • Drifting into Heresy Article by Michael Beates

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    More than 120 years before the American Revolution, the charter of Harvard College was established. But the “Rules and Precepts” of the college adopted in 1646 show that the leaders saw education (and all of life) as an arena in which God was central, and theology they considered the crown jewel of the arts and sciences. Almost 350 years later, the professors of law, ethics, theology, and history at this esteemed institution hold convictions and teach perspectives that would chill the already cold bones of the school’s founders, not to mention those godly people who endowed the school with their … View Resource

  • Error and Our Era Article by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    Truth is great and will prevail, if left to itself.” Thus asserted Thomas Jefferson, champion of free speech and enemy of established religion. I’m not sure that Jefferson entirely believed that. Jefferson did believe that only an educated, well-informed citizenry could remain a free citizenry. His commitment to freedom of the press was based on a desire to see a citizenry committed to the disciplines of reading, marking, inwardly digesting, and weighing the arguments of works such as Common Sense and The Federalist papers, not Howard Stern or Tina Brown. As Richard Mitchell has commented, Jefferson could not have imagined … View Resource

  • Help! My Neighbor’s a Heretic Article by Mike Malone

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    My middle daughter had a great concern for a boy in our neighborhood and his family. They did not attend church, and they “never read the Bible.” She suggested that we buy her friend a copy of the Scriptures, which she would deliver to him. What were we to do? The potential for alienation from our neighborhood was written all over our daughter’s naive request. The mother came by one afternoon and engaged me in conversation. “You know, we don’t go to church, but we believe in God. We just don’t believe it’s right to shove our beliefs off … View Resource

  • Heresy and Those Who Fought It Article by Frank Farrell

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    To murder the soul is worse than murdering the body, so the teaching of heresy should be punishable by death.” I have never forgotten this statement made to me 40 years ago by a monk in the Trappist monastery of Mount Melleray in the south of Ireland. Though I could not agree with the penalty, he had joltingly reminded me of the seriousness of heresy in a century which tends to take it very lightly. It has been said that the history of the church is the history of heresies. To forget or neglect them is to lay oneself open … View Resource