• What Is Your Only Comfort? Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Of all the Reformation-era catechisms, perhaps none is as well-loved as the Heidelberg Catechism. In the opening question and answer, the personal and distinctive tone of the catechism becomes evident. “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” This is not a theoretical question—“What would be necessary if God were to comfort sinners?” Rather, this is a very practical question—“How do I have comfort as long as I live and then when I die?” The key word in the opening question is comfort (German, trost). The word refers to our assurance and confidence in the finished … View Resource

  • The Heidelberg Catechism Article by Lyle Bierma

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    Q. What is your only comfort in life and in death? A. That I am not my own but belong — body and soul, in life and in death — to my faithful Savior Jesus Christ.  These are the opening lines of the most famous question and answer of probably the most famous catechism of the sixteenth century: the Heidelberg Catechism of 1563. Within a few months of its appearance, Heinrich Bullinger, leader of the Reformed church in Zurich, was hailing it as “the best catechism ever published.” It was soon translated from German into Latin, Dutch, English … View Resource

  • Confessionally Challenged Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2008

    One dutchman, a theologian. Two dutchmen, a church. Three dutchmen, a schism — or so the saying goes. Though such a saying could rightly include Englishmen or Frenchmen, historically the Dutch have demonstrated their fervent tenacity for defining the truth, defending the truth, and, when necessary, dividing over the truth. Nevertheless, for the past four centuries, Dutch reformed churches, and for that matter all continental reformed churches have remained committed to three forms of confessional unity.  While some of our readers have perhaps heard of the Three Forms of Unity, it is likely that very few could explain that … View Resource