• Five Arguments Against Future Justification According to Works (Part I) Article by Richard Phillips

    The year 2009 witnessed a publishing event of real interest to many Christians: the publication of N.T. Wright’s Justification: God’s Plan and Paul’s Vision. Wright is widely considered the most provocative writer on justification today and the arrival of this book has deservedly garnered much attention. My purpose in this article is not to review Wright’s book as a whole or even to assess his overall teaching on justification. Rather, I intend to respond to that part of his teaching that proposes a future justification by works for believers in Jesus Christ. View Resource

  • Out of the Many, One Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    In the title “United States of America,” the emphasis is necessarily on the word united. When America was in its infancy and seeking to establish itself as a sovereign nation, it faced many challenges, not the least of which was that King George of England was not interested in letting his colonies in America go free. If these colonies were to establish themselves as a nation apart from British rule, they were going to have to do so by defeating the most powerful army on the earth, namely, the British Army. To do so, it would have to pull … View Resource

  • The Gospel Is for the Broken Article by Rod Rosenbladt

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2009

      In this article I want to address a particular problem: What we might do as Christians with those who see themselves as “alumni” of the Christian faith. By that I mean those who once professed that Christ shed His blood, freely justified them before God, forgave their sin, gave them eternal life — but now they don’t believe it. Given my limited space, I can only deal with today’s “sad ones,” the “having-given-up-on-it-all” ones. (In the full address of which this article is a condensed version, I also talk a little about the gospel of Christ for today’s “mad … View Resource

  • The Witness of John Article by Robert Cara

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    I have just again read through the gospel of John. Yes, it is an amazing book at many levels. At the level of literature, it is enjoyable to read. The vocabulary is fairly simple, but the repeated use of similar expressions is profound (for example, the “I am” statements). Although there are not many explicit Old Testament quotations, John is full of Old Testament themes and allusions (such as “shepherd,” “bread,” “lifted-up serpent”). There are many examples of irony (for instance, the blind man “sees” Jesus, but those who “see” cannot, John 9; Caiaphas’ prediction about Jesus’ death was more profoundly … View Resource

  • The Witness of Luke Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Imagine for a moment that you are a citizen of the Roman Empire during the first century. You are living at a time of peace and prosperity under the reign of the caesar, whom many call “lord.” Most of your life you have admired Jewish ethics, even though you reject practices like circumcision. Perhaps you have even become a God-fearer, a Gentile who embraces Jewish monotheism without adopting the ceremonial regulations of the Mosaic law. Now imagine that you have just heard the gospel of salvation from a man named Paul. This apostle has told you that lordship belongs only … View Resource

  • The Witness of Mark Article by S.M. Baugh

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Matthew contains 97 percent of Mark’s verses. Why, then, do we have Mark, since we could just read Matthew? Two competing theories reply that either Mark was written as a digest of the larger Matthew or that Matthew was written later as an expansion of Mark. Regardless of possible gospel origins, we should not fail to appreciate that Mark has its own value in the New Testament canon apart from comparison with the other gospels. Mark is a brilliant, lively, exciting presentation of Jesus as the Messiah who marched inevitably to the cross where He was determined to give Himself … View Resource

  • The Unchanging Gospel Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    I am a Christian, and I am a Protestant. I am a Christian because I trust Jesus Christ alone, believing that salvation is accomplished by grace alone through faith alone because of Christ alone. I am a devout Protestant because I continue to protest against anyone who even suggests that salvation is accomplished in any other way.  When I entered Rome for the first time not too long ago, I was naturally looking forward to visiting St. Peter’s Basilica within the towering walls of Vatican City. As I stood under the world’s tallest dome, I was simply in awe of its … View Resource

  • A Message Worth Fighting For Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009 | Galatians 2

    Paul’s letter to the Galatians is relentless in its insistence that there is only one, true gospel. Any subtraction from or addition to the saving message of God’s work in Jesus Christ renders the gospel impotent. That is why Paul so passionately pleads with the Galatians to hold unswervingly to the truth that he taught them, namely, that salvation comes by grace alone through faith alone in Jesus Christ alone. Deviate from this, he warns, and you will miss God.  To illustrate the seriousness of what is at stake Paul writes about a very public and potentially scandalous confrontation that he … View Resource

  • The Gospel of Reality Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are not enough for many denizens of the twenty-first century. In their search for a more palatable Jesus, novelists such as Dan Brown of The Da Vinci Code, feminist theologians such as Elaine Pagels, and their acolytes in the media and pop culture are turning to the apocryphal gospels of the early heretics. These are alleged to contain a valid, alternative version of early Christianity, one that can support today’s feminism and moral permissiveness. But comparing the New Testament Gospels to those written centuries later only confirms that these writings are works of history. … View Resource

  • Judgment and Mercy Article by John de Witt

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    When I began to consider what I should say in these pages, I found myself pulled in two directions. My first impulse was to lament the spiritual decay that people of my generation have observed at close range and to urge the next generation to carry on the struggle against it with unremitting faithfulness and courage. Upon reflection, however, it seemed right to me that we should also thank God for the amazing works of grace that are being accomplished at the present time, even under a clouded sky and in adverse circumstances. Perhaps I can manage the feat of … View Resource

  • The Gospel of the Gospels Article by Daniel Hyde

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Quick. What are the Gospels? Time is up. Did you answer: “The Gospels are the biographies of Jesus Christ?” When we read the Gospels as biographies only, we basically look at them like trees apart from the proverbial forest. There is a better way to read and hear them. The Gospels are biography, but they are theological interpretations of the life of Jesus Christ with the purpose of proclaiming the coming of the king of Israel and the inauguration of His kingdom over all the earth. When read this way, we are enabled to read the gospel in the Gospels … View Resource

  • The True Sons Article by Terry Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009 | Galatians 3

    Who are the true sons of George Washington? Every player in our political arena today attempts to legitimize his or her political agenda by an appeal to the Founding Fathers. American politicians must be able to show that they embody the principles first established by our Founders. Who best represents their concepts of justice? Of freedom? Of the “common good?” Of the separation of church and state? Conservatives, liberals, the American Communist Party, and even the American Nazi Party of the 1930s present or presented themselves as the true heirs of the Founding Fathers. You may have seen pictures of the … View Resource

  • Not According to Man Article by Terry Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    My high school-aged children attend a secular prep school. The process of deciding to educate them there was long and difficult. They spent their lower and middle school years in Christian schools and home school. But in the end, all factors considered, the prep school seemed to us the best choice. Among the many challenges that have come our way as a result have been regular contact with people of other religious persuasions, Christian and non-Christian. Evangelicals are few and far between. For the most part our children have stood tall, rising above the moral and spiritual milieu that pervades the … View Resource

  • Getting the Gospel Right Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009 | Galatians 1

    Sometimes, what is not said speaks more loudly than actual words. The silence, as we say, is deafening. In the opening verses of his letter to the churches of Galatia, the apostle Paul employs this communication technique to underscore the seriousness of the subject at hand. As he does in all of his letters, Paul begins by identifying himself as the author, naming the intended recipients, and pronouncing a blessing on them (1:1–5). It is what comes next that is so uncharacteristic for him. Immediately after his introductory comments, and before launching into the body of the letter, Paul writes…nothing. … View Resource

  • One Nation, Under God Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    As I have traveled abroad, I have had to endure all sorts of snide remarks about the United States. I have seen graffiti depicting the American flag with bombs in place of stripes and skulls in place of stars. I have seen disfigured pictures of our president. I have seen the remains of a torched American flag. However, nothing could have prepared me for what I saw as I stood with my luggage in hand outside the Laleh International Hotel in Tehran, Iran. Lying on the ground at the main entrance of the hotel is a giant American flag, which serves as … View Resource