• The Lord Was with Him Article by David Murray

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    The Bible says that “the Lord was with” Abraham, Joseph, David, and Hezekiah. We’re also told that Enoch and Noah “walked with God.” These are two sides of the same coin, two perspectives on the same experience of God’s special presence with His people. This was a gracious experience. Humanity had severed itself from God by sin, but God in mercy came down to humanity again to reconcile, to reestablish, to reconnect, and to re-commune. These were all sinners separated from God by sin, and distant from God by nature. Yet God drew near to them, drew them … View Resource

  • One Lord Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2013

    Eighteen years ago, my jaw figuratively dropped to the floor as I sat in the first Old Testament course of my academic career. I attended a secular university, so I did not expect much true biblical teaching. However, I had hope the Scriptures would be treated fairly because my professor was an Orthodox Jew. You can imagine my surprise, then, when my professor said faithful ancient Israelites did not deny the existence of other gods. They worshiped Yahweh above the rest of the gods, he said, but they believed those gods were real. Liberal “highercritical” circles accept as dogma my … View Resource

  • Love That Is Patient and Kind Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    First Corinthians 13 is one of the most famous passages in all of Scripture, for in it the Apostle Paul gives us a marvelous exposition of the character of godly love. He starts by showing the importance of love, writing that if we have all kinds of gifts, abilities, and achievements but lack love, we are nothing (vv. 1–3). Then, in verse 4, he begins to describe what godly love looks like, saying, “Love is patient and kind,” or, in the wording of a more traditional translation, “Love suffers long and is kind” (NKJV). I find myself intrigued by this … View Resource

  • God is Light Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    Few things in the created order have been as instructive for the human race as the concept of light or the contrast between light and darkness. As helpful and healthy as actual light sources are, our dependence on the concept of light as a suitable metaphor for much of the human experience almost rivals our dependence on the real thing. The light/darkness contrast is used with great facility in both verbal and visual communication to convey the importance and benefits of knowledge, ideas, and technology (light), and the disadvantage of being without these things, that is, to be in … View Resource

  • Christ Our Church Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    There are a number of Old Testament passages that figure prominently in the New Testament. In Galatians 3:10–14, several of them are quoted by the apostle, and he uses these Old Testament passages as proof texts for the doctrine that sinners are justified through faith alone. Those who trust in Jesus Christ to save them from their sins understand that it was Jesus’ suffering upon the cross that turned aside God’s wrath and anger. But this was not yet clear in the Old Testament when these passages first appeared. The first passage cited by Paul in this section is … View Resource

  • God Remembers Article by Greg Barolet

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2007 | Genesis 30

    God is sovereign, man is not, and sin distorts our understanding of this truth. God always keeps His promises to His people despite our shortcomings, as we see in Genesis 30. God blessed Jacob even though he was a cad. Laban was even blessed by God because He associated with Jacob in the business dealings (more like wheeling and dealing, actually). This is a very busy chapter, filled with lots of negotiations, re-negotiations; promises and breaking of promises, colored sheep, spotted sheep, goats and lambs — not to mention Jacob rushing ahead of God’s timing by having children with many … View Resource

  • God Is Love Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    In contrast to the East, the Western church (Rome and Protestantism) has had difficulty doing justice to the distinct identities of the three persons of the Trinity. Augustine compared them to memory, knowledge, and will — merely three aspects of a single mind — while Aquinas held that the three are “relations” in the one divine being. This trend has been pervasive — John Calvin and John Owen are notable exceptions — but, with the reappearance of the Eastern church on the radar, it is becoming recognized that equal justice should be done to the irreducible distinctions of the three … View Resource