• Teach Your Children Article by L. Michael Morales

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2013

    Bernard of Clairvaux, the twelfth-century doctor of the church who penned the hymn “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded,” opens his devotional classic On Loving God with the following words: “You wish for me to tell you why and how God should be loved. My answer is that God himself is the reason why He is to be loved. As for how He is to be loved, there is to be no limit to that love.” Similarly, the Shema leads us from a contemplation of the being and essence of God to our response in loving Him. For this article, we … View Resource

  • Listening at Home Article by Tedd Tripp

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    How well do you communicate? Most of us will answer in light of our ability to present our thoughts and ideas in cogent ways. But I would suggest that the finest art of communication in our family life is not expressing our ideas. It is understanding the thoughts and ideas of the other people in the family. This is a recurring theme of the book of Proverbs. “A fool takes no pleasure in understanding, but only in expressing his opinion” (Prov. 18:2). The agenda of a fool in conversation is getting things off his chest. Even when he is … View Resource

  • The Gospel and the Gender Wars Article by Russell Moore

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    Lewis Grizzard, the famous Atlanta newspaper columnist, wrote frequently of his ill-fated marriages, divorces, and remarriages. Eventually, he said he was going to give up on marriage altogether, that there wouldn’t be another Mrs. Grizzard. “I’m just going to find a woman who hates me and buy her a house,” he quipped. Grizzard’s lament elicited laughter, despite the obvious tragedy of his relational life, because it rang true to an American culture increasingly rife with gender wars. The universal tensions between men and women sometimes show up in their most innocuous form in jokes from women about … View Resource

  • Sinners in a Fishbowl Article by Barnabas Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    Being a pastor’s kid (PK) is the only life I know. I was born one, and though I am no longer a child, I am still a PK. The greatest advantages and blessings in my life are products or bi-products of being a PK. Those blessings are not what I am setting out to describe, however. I am out to set forth the unique struggles PKs face. Pastors’ kids have a reputation. We are the rebellious ones. We are the contrarians and the problem children. We are hell-raisers and hypocrites. Not all of us, mind you, but the shoe definitely … View Resource

  • A Child’s (Mis)understanding Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2012

    Like many, I have watched my fair share of films over the years, and the vast majority have been quite forgettable. There are a small number that I enjoyed enough to purchase in order to watch them again. But there are very, very few that were so powerful in one way or another that they have stayed with me years after seeing them. (I am still not sure I will ever forgive Walt Disney for the trauma inflicted by Old Yeller.) When I think about the films I’ve seen as an adult that have really stayed with me, three come … View Resource

  • A Community for Broken Homes Article by James Coffield

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    It’s 10:30 a.m. on Sunday morning and a monumental battle is being waged. Margi wants to go to church, but is it really worth the trouble? Her disabled son is more difficult to deal with in the mornings. She doesn’t go to the earlier adult Sunday school class, for there is nowhere for her child to go. It could be that she reads too much into the glance from the lady with the perfect hair and family. Some people seem to communicate pity, some seem to be annoyed, and some are kind. She feels shame and wonders if … View Resource

  • Hope For the Broken Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Every home is dysfunctional because everyone is sinful. There is no perfect family this side of heaven, and if we were perfect parents, neither we nor our children would need a Savior. When we consider the state of the family at the beginning of the twenty-first century, our tendency is to reflect nostalgically on imagined idyllic days of generations past when families weren’t perfect but pretty close to it, or so we like to think. As fallen people, born into fallen families, and living in a fallen world, the simple truth is that there has never been a time when … View Resource

  • Hope in This Broken-Down World Article by Paul David Tripp

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Years before I met her, Joan had come to Christ and met and married Henry, a successful, wealthy Christian businessman. They built a mansion in an affluent suburb, had a circle of great Christian friends, and were involved together in several exciting ministry projects. As the years zipped by, Joan gave birth to three healthy and vibrant children. All in all, there was little she lacked. It wasn’t a big deal at first, but in the little moments she began to notice two things about Henry. He seemed distant, not as communicative. Furthermore, Henry seemed to be at the edge … View Resource

  • Love for the Big and the Small Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    Scripture says the human race should be fruitful and multiply (Gen. 1:28; Mal. 2:15). Children are always seen as a blessing from the Lord (PsS. 127:3–5; 128:3–4). Church growth happens evangelistically and covenantally. So I like big families. My wife and I are on our way to a big family with four little ones already. In counseling, I challenge newlyweds to think through the reasons for birth control (which I am not against) instead of just assuming it. I warn against the abortifacient possibilities of taking the pill. I try to dissuade most young couples from … View Resource

  • Caring for Our Families Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    A few years ago I wrote a short book on justification that was published by Crossway under the title Counted Righteous in Christ. In one section of it I ask, “Why would a pressured pastor with a family to care for … devote so much time and energy to the controversy over the imputation of Christ’s righteousness? Well, it is precisely because I have a family to care for, and so do hundreds of my people.” Here is part of the answer I wrote in chapter one of the book: Yes, I have a family to care for. Noël and … View Resource

  • Young Women, Idolatry & the Powerful Gospel Article by Elyse Fitzpatrick

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    We are all inveterate worshipers — it’s just something we do without thinking about it. Worshiping is part of our nature because God created us to worship Him, and, by doing so, we bring both Him and ourselves deep pleasure (Pss. 16:11; 149:4). The world is full of worshipers, and some of them actually worship God. But the truth is that most of us worship idols. It’s easy to identify idols that exist outside of us — like statues of Buddha, fast cars, or beautiful houses. Pinpointing the idols that reside within is a little trickier, however. These … View Resource

  • It Takes a Church to Raise a Child Article by Mark Bates

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    I have often heard parents of college students lament that their children return home from school, drop off the laundry, and immediately go out with friends without spending any time with the family. I remember hearing that complaint and thinking, “My little girls will never do that.” After my daughter’s first semester in college, she came home, dropped off her laundry, and immediately went to see a friend. However, I wasn’t upset. I was thankful. The “friend” that my daughter went to see is the wife of an elder. That my daughter would want to spend time with this … View Resource

  • The Covenant Way Article by Susan Hunt

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    Even to old age and gray hairs, O God, do not forsake me, until I proclaim your might to another generation” (Ps. 71:18). One of the things I feel an urgency to proclaim to our covenant sons and daughters is that “God created man in his own image … male and female he created them… . And God said to them, ‘Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion’” (Gen. 1:27–28). View Resource

  • Bedtime Stories Article by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008

    As a father of five children, and now a grandfather, I have spent three and a half decades seeking to pass down the Christian faith to the next generation. Let me deal with only one area of this vast work — one, I believe, that appears to have had some effectiveness in bringing up our little ones “in the nurture and admonition of the Lord,” so that now as adults they all confess Christ. I take for granted the general atmosphere in which Christians are to raise their children: faithful church attendance, some kind of daily family worship, love … View Resource

  • Family Religion Article by Melton Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2007

    I recently was privileged to speak at an ancient country church. It was a rural church, the kind with a fine graveyard, an old bell in the steeple, a formal “ladies parlor,” and a nice family in the fellowship hall making pecan pie for those gathered at midweek Bible study. When I arrived I was warmly greeted and soon had a good sense of the familial nature of this evangelical assembly. Clearly everyone was there because they were related to someone who had been there before. I was struck on that occasion by how the Bible is largely a collection … View Resource