• Comforting Eve Article by Eric Watkins

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    There are countless places in the Bible that will comfort Christians in their trials or encourage them in their obedience through reflection on the things that are to come. Perhaps it is too common (and unhelpful) to reduce these things, the study of which is called eschatology, to “that hard-to-understand stuff at the end of the Bible.” Rather, I would like to suggest that eschatology is not simply that with which the Bible ends; it is also that with which the Bible begins, and that knowing our eschatology is extremely comforting. Let us begin with Eve. Among the women we … View Resource

  • The End of the End Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    When Alice found herself at a crossroads in Wonderland, she looked about for help. There in a tree nearby was a smile. Just a smile. Soon though, the full body of the Cheshire Cat appeared. Alice asked the cat which way she should go. The cat asked her where she was headed. Alice explained to him that she had no particular destination, and then the cat spoke words of wisdom—“Then it doesn’t matter.” If we are going nowhere we cannot go wrong. You can only get lost if you have a destination. Which is why eschatology matters. Rightly … View Resource

  • The First and Second Resurrection Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    In a second perspective on the “thousand years” following the binding of Satan, John saw thrones and the judges who occupied them, the souls of those who had been beheaded for staying true to Jesus (Rev. 20:4–6). These souls “came to life” and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. Their coming to life is “the first resurrection,” and it shows that “the second death”—the eternal torment that awaits God’s enemies (19:20; 20:10, 14–15)—has no power over them. Some premillennialists construe “the first resurrection” as believers’ bodily resurrection at Christ’s second coming (see … View Resource

  • Not a Simple Matter Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    About ten years ago I had breakfast with one of the finest Old Testament scholars of our generation. A confessional Presbyterian, he has fought many battles for doctrinal orthodoxy and biblical fidelity, and since the 1970s has written numerous articles in theological journals, has authored several books (some of which are now considered modern classics), and has taught in some of the most doctrinally faithful seminaries in America. At that breakfast, one of the men who was with us asked the esteemed scholar to explain his view of the millennium and to identify which millennial position he affirmed. I will … View Resource

  • Reigning with Christ Article by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    One of the primary themes in the book of Revelation is the paradox of the Christian life. Believers are united to Christ, the Lamb who was slain but now reigns as the Lion from the tribe of Judah (Rev. 5–6), and they are “more than conquerors” even when they experience trial, persecution, and martyrdom for their testimony concerning Jesus Christ. G.K. Chesterton once remarked that a paradox is “the truth stood on its head to get our attention.” The depiction of the reign of believers with Christ for one thousand years in Revelation 20:4–6 is an instance of … View Resource

  • Eschatology Guy Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    My first two books were on the subjects of dispensationalism and postmillennialism, respectively. I was thrilled, then, when asked to write my third book on the doctrine of sola Scriptura and a fourth book on the doctrine of the Lord’s Supper. You see, I didn’t want to become an “eschatology guy.” What in the world, you ask, is an “eschatology guy”? And why wouldn’t I want to be one? Is it some kind of super-villain? In order to understand this fear I had, you have to understand a little bit about the dispensational circles I had recently left. I … View Resource

  • The Apocalypse Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    The book of Revelation seems to lend itself to either obsession or neglect. In the first church I attended as a new Christian, our pastor preached through the entire book of Revelation at least twice in a two-year span of time. We were convinced that Revelation was the key to understanding today‚Äôs headlines. At the other end of the spectrum are those who think Revelation is too difficult to understand and give up trying. The book is difficult, but it also promises a blessing to those who hear and keep what is written in it (1:3). Despite its difficulty, therefore, … View Resource

  • Y1K Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2010

    As the end of the tenth century approached and the year 1000 loomed closer and closer, how did Christians react? Were they convinced that the end was near? Was there fear? Hope? A mixture of both? In the nineteenth century, historians described a scene of great apprehension and expectation as the year 1000 approached, with entire populations terrified of the imminent arrival of judgment day. For most of the twentieth century, the consensus among historians was exactly the opposite. The year 1000, they argued, was a year like any other year, and people at the time were indifferent about the … View Resource

  • Secular Eschatology Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    The Bible teaches that the universe had a beginning and that it will have an end. Christians believe this, though controversies about eschatology (the end times) have long roiled in Christian circles. It illustrates how profoundly the Bible has influenced Western civilization that secularists too have their eschatologies. The natural view of time is cyclical. The Bible also recognizes — and organizes — the cyclical nature of time. But in addition to affirming the sense in which time can involve recurring cycles, the Bible also teaches that time is linear. It has a beginning and an end. Not only that … View Resource

  • Come, Lord Jesus Article by Patrick Lennox

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    When it comes to eschatology, there are two types of people that I do not want to be numbered among. There are those who avoid reading the book of Revelation because they are convinced they will never understand it, and there are those who think they have mastered it, and a mere mention of something like the weather turns into a “signs of the times” discussion. I remember reading the book of Revelation for the first time. It was seventeen years ago when I cracked open that big, old, dusty Bible in my grandmother’s bedroom. I am not even sure … View Resource

  • The Coming of the Kingdom Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2007

    If you want to start a debate, simply ask a group of Christians to explain what the Bible has to say about church government. If you want to start a shouting match, ask them what the Bible has to say about the second coming of Jesus. It is difficult to think of anything in the last two hundred years that has been the source of as much disagreement among professing Christians as the doctrines related to the second coming of Jesus. While most professing Christians agree on the fact of the second coming, virtually everything about it is debated. The … View Resource

  • The Coming of the King Article by Ken Gentry

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Few doctrines of the Bible receive more attention among evangelicals today than the second coming of Christ. And since His return is a foundational doctrine of the historic Christian faith, it well deserves our notice. Unfortunately though, the second advent is more deeply loved and firmly believed than biblically understood. We tend to have a “zeal without knowledge” in approaching this doctrine. This is tragic in that properly comprehending it is vitally important for framing a Christian worldview. After all, it exalts the consummate glory of His redemptive victory, completes the sovereign plan of God for history, and balances a … View Resource

  • Last Things First Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    It is a commonly held notion among Christians today that if you want to avoid an argument in polite Christian company, don’t talk about eschatology. Well, the sentiment to avoid arguing with a Christian brother or sister may be commendable, however, the reality is if you desire to speak about the redemptive work of God in any meaningful way, you will inevitably speak about eschatology.The Scriptures are eschatological. That is, from the first things, the Scriptures are concerned with last things. The first promise God gave to sinful humanity was an eschatological promise; it was a promise of rebuke … View Resource

  • Living in the Tension Article by Daniel Dunlap

    FROM TABLETALK | May 1992

    The Church is full of hypocrites!” Sadly, this statement is all too often true. Sometimes our actions betray our profession, leaving the spotless bride open to such charges. The presumptuous attitude of self-righteousness that we often convey to the world reveals our operational ignorance of a peculiar tension we find in the New Testament: The tension of the “already, but not yet.” “Already, but not yet” describes the tension between the benefits of redemption already experienced in this life and those benefits which await us at the consummation. Christians enjoy the “alreadyness” of the Atonement—remission of sins, adoption as children … View Resource