• By Faith, Not Fear Article by Scotty Smith

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    Lions and tigers and bears, O my!” That’s not only one of the more memorable lines from cinematic history, it’s one of the more recognizable themes in contemporary discipleship. Sometimes fear of the enemies to our faith seems much more pronounced than faith in the object of our faith — the Lord Jesus Christ. View Resource

  • Deus Pro Nobis Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    As we enter the second decade of the twenty-first century, we have reached an all-time low in terms of our expectations for college students. Both parents and students seem to have ingested a lowest-common-denominator sedative that has led many to enter college with an overwhelming feeling of doubt and desperation. Many parents are content simply to see their children get through college without becoming dropouts, drunks, or drug addicts. In turn, students are content to graduate without their parents finding out how close they came to becoming all three. View Resource

  • Overcoming Doubt Article by Scott Devor

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    I began my college years ready to conquer the world for Christ. The reality of my journey, however, tells quite a different story. College, for me, was a roller coaster of peaks and valleys — from incredible joys to the most debilitating doubts I ever experienced. Thus, I have come to understand my time in college as being filled with good, bad, and ugly. View Resource

  • Thriving at College Article by Alex Chediak

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    College represents a minefield of temptation for the Christian student. It is often the first time a young person raised in a godly home is under the direct, ongoing infl uence of both professors with secular agendas and classmates with immoral ambitions. Character-polluting influences can be readily discovered even at many Christian colleges, where freedom from Mom and Dad results in some experimenting with sin, perhaps manifesting an unconverted state. View Resource

  • A Passion for Truth Article by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    The prince of preachers, Charles Haddon Spurgeon, once wrote in his wonderful John Plowman’s Talks, “I would have everybody able to read and write and cipher; indeed, I don’t think a man can know too much; but mark you, the knowing of these things is not education; and there are millions of your reading and writing people who are as ignorant as neighbor Norton’s calf.” Those ignorant masses of whom Spurgeon wrote are not those who failed to finish their lessons. They are instead those who did finish — or rather those who naïvely thought that lessons were the … View Resource

  • Marks of a Great Teacher: Understanding Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1993

    The K-I-S-S principle is frequently requested in a learning environment. The acrostic stands for “Keep it simple, stupid.” It seems we are a people who loathe difficult study. We want easy answers and we want them quickly. Mastery of a subject, however, requires years of diligent labor and study. But once the teacher has mastered his material, how does he transmit it to his students? Certain assumptions are made in the classroom. The first is that the teacher knows more about the subject than the student. It is, in general, a safe assumption. The second assumption is that the … View Resource