• The Assurance of Discipline Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    The older I get, the more I wish my father had disciplined me more than he did, and the more I grow in Christ, the more I pray for my heavenly Father’s loving discipline. When we’re immature we see discipline as a negative thing, but as we grow we begin to see it as one of the most enduring blessings of life. Discipline assures us that we’re loved and cared for. It shows us to whom we belong. It demonstrates we are worth another’s time and energy. It makes us confront, confess, and repent of our … View Resource

  • Discipline in the Home Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    Early in our married life, my wife, Donna, spent two years working as a pediatric nurse at a large children’s hospital. Her unit regularly saw young patients who were in desperate need of medical care, sometimes extreme medical care. One of the greatest challenges of her job, exceeding even the emotional toll of caring for children who never did recover, was dealing with well-intentioned but misguided relatives of her patients. Occasionally, parents or other concerned family members would complain and even interfere with the treatment prescribed for sick and injured children. They could not stand seeing their child endure … View Resource

  • Recovering Lost Disciplines Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    As I write, I am looking out over the vast and cold Atlantic Ocean as I come to the end of a short family getaway at the beach. I have shut off my mobile phone. I have closed all unnecessary programs on my computer. I have turned off the music I had been listening to while I read a few articles online, and, as is my habit before sitting down to write, I prayed and asked the Lord to grant me discernment as I strive to write for his glory and for the edification of his people. The missionary and … View Resource

  • How to Stay Christian in Seminary Article by David Mathis

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    The point is this.” I love it when Paul says that in 2 Corinthians 9:6. He makes sure he has our attention and tells it straight. Behind the reasoned prose and the rhetorical flourishes, here’s what he’s getting at—plain, simple, straightforward. “The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.” Beautifully direct. The same humble approach helps when we take up the topic of “staying Christian” in seminary. There is so much (good) advice to be given. There are many experiences to be relayed, warnings to be … View Resource

  • The Discipline of Serving Article by Donald Whitney

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    Thus far this year in Tabletalk, I have focused on the gospel and the personal spiritual disciplines of the Christian life. the discipline of serving comes next, and I know Most other disciplines sound much more interesting. Meditation on Scripture appeals to our desire for spiritual depth. Fasting can strike us as a challenge to a rugged, self-denying discipleship. But serving? It sounds so mundane, even demeaning. Enter Jesus and the gospel. Jesus declared, “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28). God … View Resource

  • The Discipline of God Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    Church programs, campus ministries, and independent organizations today emphasize the need for radical discipleship. It is not always clear what they mean by this. The word radical can be a trendy term. What is clear is this: if one’s view of discipleship undervalues discipline, then we can say that whatever adjective that person uses before the term discipleship, the latter has ceased to be biblical. View Resource

  • The Perils Facing the Evangelical Church Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2009

    When we consider the predicament that the evangelical church of the twenty-first century faces in America, the first thing we need to understand is the very designation “evangelical church” is itself a redundancy. If a church is not evangelical, it is not an authentic church. The redundancy is similar to the language that we hear by which people are described as “born-again Christians.” If a person is born again of the Spirit of God, that person is, to be sure, a Christian. If a person is not regenerated by the Holy Spirit, he may profess to be a Christian, but … View Resource

  • Justice Served Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2007

    From a young age my family always encouraged me to read. Without fail, I received at least one book in addition to other presents every birthday or Christmas morning. My favorite books to read as a child were in a series called The Great Brain. These novels, set in late nineteenth-century Utah, told the stories of a smart (and crooked) pre-teen boy named Tom as related by his brother J.D. In one of the books in this series, Tom is sent off to a boarding school, and J.D. is left for a year to live life without … View Resource