• Advice for the Pop Culturally Perplexed Article by Ted Turnau

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2013

    We live in a world that is saturated with non-Christian popular culture, and many Christians don’t know how to respond. Some just enjoy it without giving it another thought. Some try to withdraw into a “holy huddle,” avoiding it to preserve their purity. Can we respond in a way that seeks to connect with our children and friends while at the same time guarding our hearts? I believe we can, but we must look past the surface of popular culture to see how it affects one’s worldview. How does popular culture influence worldview? The best popular culture doesn’t preach or … View Resource

  • Angels and Demons Go Pop Culture Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    I believe there are angels among us,” sang the pop-country group Alabama to the accompaniment of a children’s choir. And most Americans agree. According to a 2005 Fox News poll, 79 percent of Americans believe in angels. This belief is apparently on the rise, up from 72 percent a decade earlier.  Albert Winseman, the religion and values editor with the Gallup pollsters, has noted the paradox that as secularism in America increases belief in “entities from the beyond” is also increasing.  The new popularity of angels not only crosses religious lines, it crosses religious and non-religious lines. New Age devotees … View Resource

  • The Antidote to Post-humanism Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    Are you ready for the posthuman future? We are living in an age of radical transformations in science, technology, and worldview. Standing at the center of the worldview now dominant in our society is an affirmation that human beings have the right, if not the responsibility, to “improve” themselves in every way. In a culture that celebrates youth, attractiveness, and achievement, the idea of personal improvement is now being stretched beyond what previous generations could have imagined. “It is a natural human desire to manipulate our bodies to look better, feel better, and age better,” ethicist Wesley Smith explains. “We … View Resource

  • Beacon of Holiness Article by Alistair Begg

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    If the Word does not dwell with power in us,” wrote Puritan John Owen, “it will not pass with power from us” (The Works of John Owen, vol. 16, p. 76.). This godly minister personified this truth in his personal life and public ministry more than three centuries ago. For years he carried the message of Jesus Christ into the trenches of a culture as chaotic as our own while simultaneously dealing with the death of his wife and all eleven of his children. John Owen was no ivory tower theologian, but rather a zealous pastor who worked … View Resource

  • A Brave New World Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    On September 14, 2001, as the United States was still coming to grips with al Qaeda’s assault on New York and Washington, D.C., dignitaries gathered in the national cathedral to memorialize the dead and show forth the country’s resolve to stand united against its attackers. Though ostensibly a Christian house of worship, the clergy leading the service did not all represent the Christian faith. In fact, a rabbi and an imam both had roles in the “worship,” which was opened with an invocation calling upon the “God of Abraham and Mohammed and Father of our Lord, Jesus Christ.” The most … View Resource

  • Catechisms for the Imagination Article by N.D. Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    What are stories for? Ask an average group of young American narrative consumers this question and they most likely won’t know what you mean. What you’ll likely get are blank faces, shrugs. So, let’s get more specific. What are movies, TV shows, comic books, and novels for? What’s the point? Why watch? Why read? Why do we as a culture bother to spend billions of dollars (and hours) creating and consuming stories? The consensus answer—regardless of whether the kids asked are active and aggressive readers or merely passive imbibers of whatever happens to be on—will almost always come down to … View Resource

  • Christ and Culture Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    In the first centuries following the death and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah and the inauguration of the new covenant under which the people of God became a trans-national people crossing all borders, the church had few choices in the matter of her relationship to the surrounding culture. The options were limited due to persecution. As the church gained in numbers and influence, however, the situation began to change. With the (at least nominal) conversion of the Roman Emperor Constantine and the Edict of Milan (AD 313), the questions became acute. Now Christianity was tolerated. Would this new circumstance allow the … View Resource

  • Christian Publishing Article by Allan Fisher

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2009

      Looking for things for which to thank the Lord this Thanksgiving? Start by asking this question: Where would my church be without Christian publishing companies? Imagine your pastor preparing his sermons week in and week out with only a Bible, perhaps in a language that is not his native tongue, with no Bible reference works, whether in print or digital format, and with no periodicals and journals. Imagine your worship services without pew Bibles, hymnals, or choir music. Take away as well the text projected on a screen in front of the sanctuary. Imagine your Sunday school teachers with … View Resource

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch Article by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying” is in danger of being left unsaid. The best of the church-growth movement deserves better than that.Our present concern, however, is not the good but rather the bad and the in-between. For if the movement has a threefold positive significance, it also has a threefold weakness.First, the church-growth movement has two common deficiencies. On the one hand, its theological … View Resource

  • Committed Surrender Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Therefore, let those who suffer according to God’s will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator” (1 Peter 4:19). Whatever happened to dating? I first noticed a decline in dating when our daughter, Jamie, was in high school. She told me she was just going out with friends. Going out with friends turned into “hanging out” with friends. Evidently dating was “out” and hanging out was “in.” If I understood the cultural vernacular, hanging out meant less of a commitment. The way Jamie and her friends used the word I got the idea that “dating” was one step short of … View Resource

  • Compromising Truth and Practice Article by Walter Chantry

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Just before Jesus was taken up into heaven He told His disciples: “You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth” (Acts 1:8). Witnessing about who Jesus is and what He taught was to be cross-cultural. As His disciples faced new social and cultural changes, they were expected to hold fast to truth and righteousness so as to be bright lights of witnessing all over the world. View Resource

  • The Consequences of Truth Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2007

    Readers of Tabletalk over the last 30 years have learned a lot about theology. But they have also learned a lot about history, philosophy, and the arts. The various writers of the “Truth and Consequences” column have been writing about culture, a category that includes everything from great literature to awful TV, from family values to moral collapse. What Tabletalk has been serving up over three decades is not just Bible study but more broadly, truth. “Truth” is a word that these days nearly always comes with quotation marks around it. Many people today believe there isn’t such a thing. … View Resource

  • Cultural Evangelism, Seventh-Century Style Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2007

    Christians today often talk about evangelizing the culture, transforming the culture, and finding ways to communicate with people of another culture. What that looks like can be seen in seventh-century English literature. J.R.R. Tolkien was as great a literary scholar as he was a writer of heroic fantasy. In his article “Beowulf: The Monster and the Critics,” Tolkien described the worldview of Germanic paganism as held by the early Angles and Saxons who seized Britain from the Celts.  Whereas the Greek religion with its philandering gods had little moral content, he said, the Germanic religion featured a strong moral dualism. … View Resource

  • Discerning the News Article by Sarah Bailey

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    It’s no secret that many Christians harbor deep skepticism of the “liberal media elite.” Some have been burned by the media, noting unfair or unfriendly coverage from the past. “I never just accept what newspapers say about people. I’ve seen them get facts, quotes, and reasons wrong far too many times,” California pastor Rick Warren wrote on Twitter earlier this year. Or, as popular blogger Jon Acuff has suggested, Christians tend to treat the secular media as though it were Satan’s newspaper. The skepticism runs deeply in response to perceptions Americans feel about how the media treats religion. Just 19 … View Resource

  • Don’t Look Back Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with more flair than Liberace. I even had my own polyester jumpsuit. I looked like a cross between Howdy Doody and Elvis, in his latter years. The current fashion craze of recreating the nightmare of the seventies hasn’t filled my heart with a warm dose of nostalgia. Instead it makes me embarrassed for what I used to wear. I’ve learned my lesson … View Resource